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dc.contributor.authorMooney, T. Aran  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDi Iorio, Lucia  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLammers, Marc O.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLin, Tzu-Hao  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorNedelec, Sophie L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorParsons, Miles  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRadford, Craig A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorUrban, Ed  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStanley, Jenni  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-30T19:43:13Z
dc.date.available2020-09-30T19:43:13Z
dc.date.issued2020-08-26
dc.identifier.citationMooney, T. A., Di Iorio, L., Lammers, M., Lin, T., Nedelec, S. L., Parsons, M., Radford, C., Urban, E., & Stanley, J. (2020). Listening forward: approaching marine biodiversity assessments using acoustic methods. Royal Society Open Science, 7(8), 201287.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/26256
dc.description© The Author(s), 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Mooney, T. A., Di Iorio, L., Lammers, M., Lin, T., Nedelec, S. L., Parsons, M., Radford, C., Urban, E., & Stanley, J. Listening forward: approaching marine biodiversity assessments using acoustic methods. Royal Society Open Science, 7(8), (2020): 201287, doi:10.1098/rsos.201287.en_US
dc.description.abstractEcosystems and the communities they support are changing at alarmingly rapid rates. Tracking species diversity is vital to managing these stressed habitats. Yet, quantifying and monitoring biodiversity is often challenging, especially in ocean habitats. Given that many animals make sounds, these cues travel efficiently under water, and emerging technologies are increasingly cost-effective, passive acoustics (a long-standing ocean observation method) is now a potential means of quantifying and monitoring marine biodiversity. Properly applying acoustics for biodiversity assessments is vital. Our goal here is to provide a timely consideration of emerging methods using passive acoustics to measure marine biodiversity. We provide a summary of the brief history of using passive acoustics to assess marine biodiversity and community structure, a critical assessment of the challenges faced, and outline recommended practices and considerations for acoustic biodiversity measurements. We focused on temperate and tropical seas, where much of the acoustic biodiversity work has been conducted. Overall, we suggest a cautious approach to applying current acoustic indices to assess marine biodiversity. Key needs are preliminary data and sampling sufficiently to capture the patterns and variability of a habitat. Yet with new analytical tools including source separation and supervised machine learning, there is substantial promise in marine acoustic diversity assessment methods.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for development of this article was provided by the collaboration of the Urban Coast Institute (Monmouth University, NJ, USA), the Program for the Human Environment (The Rockefeller University, New York, USA) and the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research. Partial support was provided to T.A.M. from the National Science Foundation grant OCE-1536782.en_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.201287
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectsoundscapeen_US
dc.subjectbioacousticsen_US
dc.subjectrichnessen_US
dc.subjectecosystem healthen_US
dc.titleListening forward: approaching marine biodiversity assessments using acoustic methodsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsos.201287


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International