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dc.contributor.authorWerner, William J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSanderman, Jonathan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMelillo, Jerry M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-26T14:44:31Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-04
dc.identifier.citationWerner, W. J., Sanderman, J., & Melillo, J. M. (2020). Decreased soil organic matter in a long-term soil warming experiment lowers soil water holding capacity and affects soil thermal and hydrological buffering. Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, 125(4), e2019JG005158.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25901
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2020. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research- Biogeosciences 125(4), (2020): e2019JG005158, doi:10.1029/2019JG005158.en_US
dc.description.abstractLong‐term soil warming can decrease soil organic matter (SOM), resulting in self‐reinforcing feedback to the global climate system. We investigated additional consequences of SOM reduction for soil water holding capacity (WHC) and soil thermal and hydrological buffering. At a long‐term soil warming experiment in a temperate forest in the northeastern United States, we suspended the warming treatment for 104 days during the summer of 2017. The formerly heated plot remained warmer (+0.39 °C) and drier (−0.024 cm3 H2O cm−3 soil) than the control plot throughout the suspension. We measured decreased SOM content (−0.184 g SOM g−1 for O horizon soil, −0.010 g SOM g−1 for A horizon soil) and WHC (−0.82 g H2O g−1 for O horizon soil, −0.18 g H2O g−1 for A horizon soil) in the formerly heated plot relative to the control plot. Reduced SOM content accounted for 62% of the WHC reduction in the O horizon and 22% in the A horizon. We investigated differences in SOM composition as a possible explanation for the remaining reductions with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. We found FTIR spectra that correlated more strongly with WHC than SOM, but those particular spectra did not differ between the heated and control plots, suggesting that SOM composition affects WHC but does not explain treatment differences in this study. We conclude that SOM reductions due to soil warming can reduce WHC and hydrological and thermal buffering, further warming soil and decreasing SOM. This feedback may operate in parallel, and perhaps synergistically, with carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to acknowledge Jeffery Blanchard, Priya Chowdhury, Kristen DeAngelis, Luiz Dominguez‐Horta, Kevin Geyer, Rachelle Lacroix, Xaiojun Liu, William Rodriguez, and Alexander Truchonand and for assistance with field sampling. We would like to acknowledge Michael Bernard for assistance with field sampling and lab work. We would like to acknowledge Aaron Ellison for statistical consultation. This research was financially supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation's Long Term Ecological Research Program (NSF‐DEB‐0620443 and NSF‐DEB‐1237491), the Long Term Research in Environmental Biology Program (NSF DEB‐1456528) , and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE‐DE‐SC0005421 and DOE‐DE‐SC0010740). Data used in this study are available from the Harvard Forest Data Archive (Datasets HF018‐03, HF018‐04, and HF018‐13), accessible at https://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/harvard‐forest‐data‐archive.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2019JG005158
dc.titleDecreased soil organic matter in a long-term soil warming experiment lowers soil water holding capacity and affects soil thermal and hydrological bufferingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2020-10-04en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2019JG005158
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-10-04


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