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dc.contributor.authorMohl, Jonathon E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFetcher, Ned  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStunz, Elizabeth  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTang, Jianwu  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMoody, Michael L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-25T20:25:54Z
dc.date.available2020-06-25T20:25:54Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-02
dc.identifier.citationMohl, J. E., Fetcher, N., Stunz, E., Tang, J., & Moody, M. L. (2020). Comparative transcriptomics of an arctic foundation species, tussock cottongrass (Eriophorum vaginatum), during an extreme heat event. Scientific Reports, 10(1), 8990.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25897
dc.description© The Author(s), 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Mohl, J. E., Fetcher, N., Stunz, E., Tang, J., & Moody, M. L. Comparative transcriptomics of an arctic foundation species, tussock cottongrass (Eriophorum vaginatum), during an extreme heat event. Scientific Reports, 10(1), (2020): 8990, doi:10.1038/s41598-020-65693-8.en_US
dc.description.abstractTussock cottongrass (Eriophorum vaginatum) is a foundation species for much of the arctic moist acidic tundra, which is currently experiencing extreme effects of climate change. The Arctic is facing higher summer temperatures and extreme weather events are becoming more common. We used Illumina RNA-Seq to analyse cDNA libraries for differential expression of genes from leaves of ecologically well-characterized ecotypes of tussock cottongrass found along a latitudinal gradient in the Alaskan Arctic and transplanted into a common garden. Plant sampling was performed on a typical summer day and during an extreme heat event. We obtained a de novo assembly that contained 423,353 unigenes. There were 363 unigenes up-regulated and 1,117 down-regulated among all ecotypes examined during the extreme heat event. Of these, 26 HSP unigenes had >log2-fold up-regulation. Several TFs associated with heat stress in previous studies were identified that had >log2-fold up- or down-regulation during the extreme heat event (e.g., DREB, NAC). There was consistent variation in DEGs among ecotypes, but not specifically related to whether plants originated from taiga or tundra ecosystems. As the climate changes it is essential to determine ecotypic diversity at the genomic level, especially for widespread species that impact ecosystem function.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Thomas Parker for providing crucial logistical support at Toolik Field station and Darrel Dech, Stephen Turner, and Mayra Melendez for assistance in field sampling. Funding for this research was provided through the National Science Foundation (NSF/PLR 1418010 to NF, NSF/PLR 1417645 to MLM, NSF/PLR 1417763 to JT) and JEM received funding in part from NIH Grant #5G12RR007592 from the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)/NIH to UTEP’s Border Biomedical Research Center. Significant logistic support came from Toolik Field Station and the Arctic LTER (NSF/PLR 1637459).en_US
dc.publisherNature Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-65693-8
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleComparative transcriptomics of an arctic foundation species, tussock cottongrass (Eriophorum vaginatum), during an extreme heat eventen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-020-65693-8


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