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dc.contributor.authorChakraborty, Anirban  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRuff, S. Emil  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDong, Xiyang  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorEllefson, Emily D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLi, Carmen  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, James M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcBee, Jayme  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBernard, Bernie B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHubert, Casey R. J.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T21:24:20Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T21:24:20Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-30
dc.identifier.citationChakraborty, A., Ruff, S. E., Dong, X., Ellefson, E. D., Li, C., Brooks, J. M., McBee, J., Bernard, B. B., & Hubert, C. R. J. (2020). Hydrocarbon seepage in the deep seabed links subsurface and seafloor biospheres. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 202002289.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25801
dc.description© The Author(s), 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Chakraborty, A., Ruff, S. E., Dong, X., Ellefson, E. D., Li, C., Brooks, J. M., McBee, J., Bernard, B. B., & Hubert, C. R. J. Hydrocarbon seepage in the deep seabed links subsurface and seafloor biospheres. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, (2020): 202002289, doi: 10.1073/pnas.2002289117.en_US
dc.description.abstractMarine cold seeps transmit fluids between the subseafloor and seafloor biospheres through upward migration of hydrocarbons that originate in deep sediment layers. It remains unclear how geofluids influence the composition of the seabed microbiome and if they transport deep subsurface life up to the surface. Here we analyzed 172 marine surficial sediments from the deep-water Eastern Gulf of Mexico to assess whether hydrocarbon fluid migration is a mechanism for upward microbial dispersal. While 132 of these sediments contained migrated liquid hydrocarbons, evidence of continuous advective transport of thermogenic alkane gases was observed in 11 sediments. Gas seeps harbored distinct microbial communities featuring bacteria and archaea that are well-known inhabitants of deep biosphere sediments. Specifically, 25 distinct sequence variants within the uncultivated bacterial phyla Atribacteria and Aminicenantes and the archaeal order Thermoprofundales occurred in significantly greater relative sequence abundance along with well-known seep-colonizing members of the bacterial genus Sulfurovum, in the gas-positive sediments. Metabolic predictions guided by metagenome-assembled genomes suggested these organisms are anaerobic heterotrophs capable of nonrespiratory breakdown of organic matter, likely enabling them to inhabit energy-limited deep subseafloor ecosystems. These results point to petroleum geofluids as a vector for the advection-assisted upward dispersal of deep biosphere microbes from subsurface to surface environments, shaping the microbiome of cold seep sediments and providing a general mechanism for the maintenance of microbial diversity in the deep sea.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe wish to thank Jody Sandel as well as the crew of R/V GeoExplorer for collection of piston cores, onboard core processing, sample preservation, and shipment. Cynthia Kwan and Oliver Horanszky are thanked for assistance with amplicon library preparation. We also wish to thank Jayne Rattray, Daniel Gittins, and Marc Strous for valuable discussions and suggestions, and Rhonda Clark for research support. Collaborations with Andy Mort from the Geological Survey of Canada, and Richard Hatton from Geoscience Wales are also gratefully acknowledged. This work was financially supported by a Mitacs Elevate Postdoctoral Fellowship awarded to A.C.; an Alberta Innovates-Technology Futures/Eyes High Postdoctoral Fellowship to S.E.R.; and a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Strategic Project Grant, a Genome Canada Genomics Applications Partnership Program grant, a Canada Foundation for Innovation grant (CFI-JELF 33752) for instrumentation, and Campus Alberta Innovates Program Chair funding to C.R.J.H.en_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciencesen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2002289117
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectdeep biosphereen_US
dc.subjectmicrobiomeen_US
dc.subjectdispersalen_US
dc.titleHydrocarbon seepage in the deep seabed links subsurface and seafloor biospheresen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.2002289117


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
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