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dc.contributor.authorRastetter, Edward B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKwiatkowski, Bonnie L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-29T20:04:48Z
dc.date.available2020-04-29T20:04:48Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-31
dc.identifier.citationRastetter, E. B., & Kwiatkowski, B. L. (2020). An approach to modeling resource optimization for substitutable and interdependent resources. Ecological Modelling, 425, 109033.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25714
dc.description© The Author(s), 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Rastetter, E. B., & Kwiatkowski, B. L. An approach to modeling resource optimization for substitutable and interdependent resources. Ecological Modelling, 425, (2020): 109033, doi:10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2020.109033.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe develop a hierarchical approach to modeling organism acclimation to changing availability of and requirements for substitutable and interdependent resources. Substitutable resources are resources that fill the same metabolic or stoichiometric need of the organism. Interdependent resources are resources whose acquisition or expenditure are tightly linked (e.g., light, CO2, and water in photosynthesis and associated transpiration). We illustrate the approach by simulating the development of vegetation with four substitutable sources of N that differ only in the cost of their uptake and assimilation. As the vegetation develops, it uses the least expensive N source first then uses progressively more expensive N sources as the less expensive sources are depleted. Transition among N sources is based on the marginal yield of N per unit effort expended, including effort expended to acquire C to cover the progressively higher uptake costs. We illustrate the approach to interdependent resources by simulating the expenditure of effort to acquire light energy, CO2, and water to drive photosynthesis in vegetation acclimated to different conditions of soil water, atmospheric vapor pressure deficit, CO2 concentration, and light levels. The approach is an improvement on the resource optimization used in the earlier Multiple Element Limitation (MEL) model.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under NSF grants 1651722, 1637459, 1603560, 1556772, 1841608. Any Opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the National Science Foundation.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2020.109033
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectResource optimizationen_US
dc.subjectAcclimationen_US
dc.subjectSubstitutable resourcesen_US
dc.subjectInterdependent resourcesen_US
dc.subjectResource limitationen_US
dc.subjectMultiple resource limitationen_US
dc.titleAn approach to modeling resource optimization for substitutable and interdependent resourcesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2020.109033


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International