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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jean A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCurry, Ennessa G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBlue, R. Eric  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRoden, Christine  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDundon, Samantha E.R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Vargas, Anthony  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJordan, Danielle C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xiaomin  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Shawn M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCrutchley, John M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Paul  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHorb, Marko E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGladfelter, Amy S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGiudice, Jimena  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-28T14:51:16Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-13
dc.identifier.citationSmith, J. A., Curry, E. G., Blue, R. E., Roden, C., Dundon, S. E. R., Rodríguez-Vargas, A., Jordan, D. C., Chen, X., Lyons, S. M., Crutchley, J., Anderson, P., Horb, M. E., Gladfelter, A. S., & Giudice, J. (2020). FXR1 splicing is important for muscle development and biomolecular condensates in muscle cells. Journal of Cell Biology, 219(4), e201911129.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25698
dc.description© The Author(s), 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Smith, J. A., Curry, E. G., Blue, R. E., Roden, C., Dundon, S. E. R., Rodríguez-Vargas, A., Jordan, D. C., Chen, X., Lyons, S. M., Crutchley, J., Anderson, P., Horb, M. E., Gladfelter, A. S., & Giudice, J. FXR1 splicing is important for muscle development and biomolecular condensates in muscle cells. Journal of Cell Biology, 219(4), (2020): e201911129, doi: 10.1083/jcb.201911129.en_US
dc.description.abstractFragile-X mental retardation autosomal homologue-1 (FXR1) is a muscle-enriched RNA-binding protein. FXR1 depletion is perinatally lethal in mice, Xenopus, and zebrafish; however, the mechanisms driving these phenotypes remain unclear. The FXR1 gene undergoes alternative splicing, producing multiple protein isoforms and mis-splicing has been implicated in disease. Furthermore, mutations that cause frameshifts in muscle-specific isoforms result in congenital multi-minicore myopathy. We observed that FXR1 alternative splicing is pronounced in the serine- and arginine-rich intrinsically disordered domain; these domains are known to promote biomolecular condensation. Here, we show that tissue-specific splicing of fxr1 is required for Xenopus development and alters the disordered domain of FXR1. FXR1 isoforms vary in the formation of RNA-dependent biomolecular condensates in cells and in vitro. This work shows that regulation of tissue-specific splicing can influence FXR1 condensates in muscle development and how mis-splicing promotes disease.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the A.S. Gladfelter and J. Giudice laboratories, Nancy Kedersha, and Silvia Ramos for critical discussions; Eunice Y. Lee for technical help; Dr. Stephanie Gupton (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC) for donation of WT C57BL/6J mouse embryos; and Marcin Wlizla and National Xenopus Resource (RRID:SCR_013731) for their help in maintaining adult frogs and other important technical support. This work has been funded by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Junior Faculty Development Award (to J. Giudice); a Nutrition and Obesity Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Pilot & Feasibility Research grant (P30DK056350 to J. Giudice); University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill startup funds (to J. Giudice); the March of Dimes Foundation (5-FY18-36, Basil O’Connor Starter Scholar Award to J. Giudice); and NCTraCs Pilot Grant (550KR181805) from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institutes of Health, through Grant Award Number UL1TR002489 (to J. Giudice), National Institutes of Health National Institute of General Medical Sciences grants (R01-GM130866 to J. Giudice, R01-GM081506 to A.S. Gladfelter, R35-GM126901 to P. Anderson, K99-GM124458 to S.M. Lyons, R25-GM089569 and 2R25-GM055336-20 to E.G. Curry); Howard Hughes Medical Institute Faculty Scholars program (A.S. Gladfelter), and National Institute of Health grants R01-HD084409 and P40-OD010997 (to M.E. Horb). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies.en_US
dc.publisherRockefeller University Pressen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201911129
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleFXR1 splicing is important for muscle development and biomolecular condensates in muscle cellsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2020-09-13en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1083/jcb.201911129
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-09-13


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