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dc.contributor.authorEcheverri, Karen  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-17T18:00:31Z
dc.date.available2020-03-17T18:00:31Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-29
dc.identifier.citationEcheverri, K. (2020). The various routes to functional regeneration in the central nervous system. Communications Biology, 3(1), 47.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25536
dc.description© The Author(s), 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Echeverri, K. The various routes to functional regeneration in the central nervous system. Communications Biology, 3(1), (2020): 47, doi:10.1038/s42003-020-0773-z.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe axolotl is a type of Mexican salamander with astonishing regenerative capacity1. In our recent paper, we identified a signaling heterodimer that is formed directly after injury in the glial cells adjacent to the injury in axolotls. The c-Fos and JunB genes forming this heterodimer are not unique to animals with high regenerative capacity but they are present in humans too. In this paper I propose perspectives on molecular control of regeneration and future directions that need to be taken to advance our understanding of regeneration at a molecular level.en_US
dc.publisherNature Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s42003-020-0773-z
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleThe various routes to functional regeneration in the central nervous systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s42003-020-0773-z


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International