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dc.contributor.authorPerks, Krista E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKrotinger, Anna  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBodznick, David  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-16T16:17:44Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-17
dc.identifier.citationPerks, K. E., Krotinger, A., & Bodznick, D. (2020). A cerebellum-like circuit in the lateral line system of fish cancels mechanosensory input associated with its own movements. Journal of Experimental Biology, 223, jeb.204438.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25528
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Company of Biologists, 2020. This article is posted here by permission of Company of Biologists for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Experimental Biology 223 (2020): jeb.204438, doi:10.1242/jeb.204438.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn animal's own movement exerts a profound impact on sensory input to its nervous system. Peripheral sensory receptors do not distinguish externally generated stimuli from stimuli generated by an animal's own behavior (reafference) – although the animal often must. One way that nervous systems can solve this problem is to provide movement-related signals (copies of motor commands and sensory feedback) to sensory systems, which can then be used to generate predictions that oppose or cancel out sensory responses to reafference. Here, we studied the use of movement-related signals to generate sensory predictions in the lateral line medial octavolateralis nucleus (MON) of the little skate. In the MON, mechanoreceptive afferents synapse on output neurons that also receive movement-related signals from central sources, via a granule cell parallel fiber system. This parallel fiber system organization is characteristic of a set of so-called cerebellum-like structures. Cerebellum-like structures have been shown to support predictive cancellation of reafference in the electrosensory systems of fish and the auditory system of mice. Here, we provide evidence that the parallel fiber system in the MON can generate predictions that are negative images of (and therefore cancel) sensory input associated with respiratory and fin movements. The MON, found in most aquatic vertebrates, is probably one of the most primitive cerebellum-like structures and a starting point for cerebellar evolution. The results of this study contribute to a growing body of work that uses an evolutionary perspective on the vertebrate cerebellum to understand its functional diversity in animal behavior.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) and Wesleyan University grants to D.B. Funding for K.E.P. while performing these experiments came in part from a grant from the HHMI Hughes V award for undergraduate education to Wesleyan University (52005211) in the form of a summer research fellowship. A.K. was supported in part by an NSF-REU Award (1659604) and a Wesleyan University Summer Research Fellowship. K.E.P. is currently supported through funding from the Simons Society of Fellows as a Junior Fellow.en_US
dc.publisherCompany of Biologistsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.204438
dc.subjectCerebellum-likeen_US
dc.subjectMechanosensory lateral lineen_US
dc.subjectPredictive cancellationen_US
dc.subjectReafferenceen_US
dc.subjectElasmobranchen_US
dc.subjectSensory systemen_US
dc.titleA cerebellum-like circuit in the lateral line system of fish cancels mechanosensory input associated with its own movementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2021-01-17en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1242/jeb.204438
dc.embargo.liftdate2021-01-17


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