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dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yingqi  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDeegan, Linda A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCarman, Mary R.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T15:37:41Z
dc.date.available2020-03-09T15:37:41Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-30
dc.identifier.citationZhang, Y., Deegan, L., & Carman, M. R. (2019). Invasive tunicate (Ascidiacea) metabolic and filtration rates in comparison to native tunicate and bivalve species. Management of Biological Invasions, 10(4), 617-625.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25505
dc.description© The Author(s), 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in [citation], doi:[doi]. Zhang, Y., Deegan, L., & Carman, M. R. Invasive tunicate (Ascidiacea) metabolic and filtration rates in comparison to native tunicate and bivalve species. Management of Biological Invasions, 10(4), (2019): 617-625, doi: 10.3391/mbi.2019.10.4.03.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeveral invasive species of tunicates (Ascidiacea) have become cosmopolitan and widely distributed in coastal areas worldwide over the past few decades. These nonindigenous tunicates have consequently caused fouling problems in aquaculture and marine harbors. The goal of our project was to enrich the understanding of how invasive tunicates interact with other organisms in the ecosystem. Two species of invasive tunicates (Didemnum vexillum and Botrylloides violaceus) and one species of native tunicate (Aplidium glabrum) were evaluated for their metabolic rates. The filtration rates for native blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and invasive tunicates (Diplosoma listerianum) were determined. D. vexillum regenerated NH4+ at a faster rate than A. glabrum and B. violaceus. Both tunicates and blue mussels were feeding on phytoplankton as their major food source, although the size of particles utilized by different organisms was not examined in this study. Invasive tunicates were strongly competing with mussels to filter feed, but were not inhibiting mussel’s filtration rate.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was part of the MBL Semester in Environmental Sciences. Special thanks to Rich McHorney, Helena McMonagle, Madeline Gorchels, and Leena Vilonen, for their guidance and assistance in the laboratory; to Michelle Woods and Olivia Bispott for their help in the field; to Anne Giblin for providing the oxygen probes; to Marshall Otter for running stable isotope samples; to Dave Remsen, Janice Simmons, and Katie Dever for providing frozen algae paste; to Dave Grunden for assistance with blue mussel collection at Martha’s Vineyard. The authors would also like to thank the two anonymous reviewers for providing comments and critiques to help improve the manuscript.en_US
dc.publisherRegional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centreen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3391/mbi.2019.10.4.03
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectcolonial tunicatesen_US
dc.subjectmetabolic rateen_US
dc.subjectblue musselsen_US
dc.subjectfiltration rateen_US
dc.titleInvasive tunicate (Ascidiacea) metabolic and filtration rates in comparison to native tunicate and bivalve speciesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3391/mbi.2019.10.4.03


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International