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dc.contributor.authorDu Clos, Kevin T.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDabiri, John O.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCostello, John H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorColin, Sean P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Jennifer R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFogerson, Stephanie M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGemmell, Brad J.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-06T17:28:12Z
dc.date.available2020-11-18T08:35:51Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-18
dc.identifier.citationDu Clos, K. T., Dabiri, J. O., Costello, J. H., Colin, S. P., Morgan, J. R., Fogerson, S. M., & Gemmell, B. J. (2019). Thrust generation during steady swimming and acceleration from rest in anguilliform swimmers. The Journal of Experimental Biology, 222(22), jeb212464.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25319
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Company of Biologists, 2019. This article is posted here by permission of Company of Biologists for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Experimental Biology 222(22), (2019): jeb212464, doi:10.1242/jeb.212464.en_US
dc.description.abstractEscape swimming is a crucial behavior by which undulatory swimmers evade potential threats. The hydrodynamics of escape swimming have not been well studied, particularly for anguilliform swimmers, such as the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. For this study, we compared the kinematics and hydrodynamics of larval sea lampreys with those of lampreys accelerating from rest during escape swimming. We used experimentally derived velocity fields to calculate pressure fields and distributions of thrust and drag along the body. Lampreys initiated acceleration from rest with the formation of a high-amplitude body bend at approximately one-quarter body length posterior to the head. This deep body bend produced two high-pressure regions from which the majority of thrust for acceleration was derived. In contrast, steady swimming was characterized by shallower body bends and negative-pressure-derived thrust, which was strongest near the tail. The distinct mechanisms used for steady swimming and acceleration from rest may reflect the differing demands of the two behaviors. High-pressure-based mechanisms, such as the one used for acceleration from rest, could also be important for low-speed maneuvering during which drag-based turning mechanisms are less effective. The design of swimming robots may benefit from the incorporation of such insights from unsteady swimming.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation (UNS-1511996 and IDBR-1455471 to B.J.G., J.O.D., S.P.C. and J.H.C.). J.R.M. was funded by the Marine Biological Laboratory.en_US
dc.publisherCompany of Biologistsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.212464
dc.subjectPetromyzon marinusen_US
dc.subjectLampreyen_US
dc.subjectUndulatoryen_US
dc.subjectThrusten_US
dc.subjectDragen_US
dc.titleThrust generation during steady swimming and acceleration from rest in anguilliform swimmersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2020-11-18en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1242/jeb.212464


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