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dc.contributor.authorBoissin, Emilie  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorThorrold, Simon R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBraun, Camrin D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yuxiang  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorClua, Eric  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPlanes, Serge  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-03T17:26:22Z
dc.date.available2020-02-03T17:26:22Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-01
dc.identifier.citationBoissin, E., Thorrold, S. R., Braun, C. D., Zhou, Y., Clua, E. E., & Planes, S. (2019). Contrasting global, regional and local patterns of genetic structure in gray reef shark populations from the Indo-Pacific region. Scientific Reports, 9(1), 15816.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/25301
dc.description© The Author(s), 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Boissin, E., Thorrold, S. R., Braun, C. D., Zhou, Y., Clua, E. E., & Planes, S. Contrasting global, regional and local patterns of genetic structure in gray reef shark populations from the Indo-Pacific region. Scientific Reports, 9(1), (2019): 15816. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-52221-6.en_US
dc.description.abstractHuman activities have resulted in the loss of over 90% of sharks in most ocean basins and one in four species of elasmobranch are now listed at risk of extinction by the IUCN. How this collapse will affect the ability of populations to recover in the face of continued exploitation and global climate change remains unknown. Indeed, important ecological and biological information are lacking for most shark species, particularly estimates of genetic diversity and population structure over a range of spatial scales. Using 15 microsatellite markers, we investigated genetic diversity and population structure in gray reef sharks over their Indo-Pacific range (407 specimens from 9 localities). Clear genetic differentiation was observed between the Indian and the Pacific Ocean specimens (FST = 0.145***). Further differentiation within the Pacific included a West and East cleavage as well as North-Central and South-Central Pacific clusters. No genetic differentiation was detected within archipelagos. These results highlight the legacy of past climate changes and the effects of large ocean expanses and circulation patterns on contrasting levels of connectivity at global, regional and local scales. Our results indicate a need for regional conservation units for gray reef sharks and pinpoint the isolation and vulnerability of their French Polynesian population.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAll of the following provided funding for the research presented here (no particular order after the first organization): Laboratoire d’Excellence CORAIL, Ministère de l’Ecologie du Développement Durable et de l’Energie, Ministère de l’Outre-Mer, Fonds Pacifique, IFRECOR, Délégation à la recherche de Polynésie, Agence Nationale de la Recherche and the Robertson Foundation. We also thank Andrew Chin, Jennifer Ovenden, Mark Meekan and Conrad Speed, Mael Imirizaldu, David Lecchini, Patrick Plantard, Jonathan Werry, Johann Mourier, Thomas Vignaud, Matis Jorge, Noémie Jublier and several other students for providing samples or for assistance with sampling. We are grateful to three anonymous reviewers who provided helpful comments.en_US
dc.publisherNature Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-52221-6
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleContrasting global, regional and local patterns of genetic structure in gray reef shark populations from the Indo-Pacific regionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-019-52221-6


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