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dc.contributor.authorSolow, Andrew R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Woollcott K.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2005-12-12T16:41:10Z
dc.date.available2005-12-12T16:41:10Z
dc.date.issued2005-02-04
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the Royal Society of London B 272 (2005): 285-287en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/249
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Royal Society, 2005. This article is posted here by permission of Royal Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 272 (2005): 285-287, doi:10.1098/rspb.2004.2955.
dc.description.abstractA common approach to estimating the number of species in a taxonomic or other group is to extrapolate the temporal pattern of historical species discoveries or descriptions. A formal statistical approach to this problem is described. This approach involves fitting an explicit model of the discovery record by maximum like lihood and using the fitted model to estimate the number of undiscovered species. The approach is applied to a description record of large marine animals covering the period 1828-1996. The estimated number of undiscovered species in this group is around 10 with an upper 0.95 confidence bound of around 16.en
dc.format.extent87145 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal Societyen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2004.2955
dc.subjectLarge marine animalsen
dc.subjectMaximum likelihood estimationen
dc.subjectNon-stationary poisson processen
dc.subjectTaxonomyen
dc.titleOn estimating the number of species from the discovery recorden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2004.2955


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