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dc.contributor.authorGurumurthy, Praneeth  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOrton, Philip M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTalke, Stefan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGeorgas, Nickitas  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBooth, James F.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T19:25:19Z
dc.date.available2019-09-10T19:25:19Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-23
dc.identifier.citationGurumurthy, P., Orton, P. M., Talke, S. A., Georgas, N., & Booth, J. F. (2019). Mechanics and historical evolution of sea level blowouts in New York harbor. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, 7(5), 160.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/24531
dc.description© The Author(s), 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Gurumurthy, P., Orton, P. M., Talke, S. A., Georgas, N., & Booth, J. F. Mechanics and historical evolution of sea level blowouts in New York harbor. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, 7(5), (2019): 160, doi:10.3390/jmse7050160.en_US
dc.description.abstractWind-induced sea level blowouts, measured as negative storm surge or extreme low water (ELW), produce public safety hazards and impose economic costs (e.g., to shipping). In this paper, we use a regional hydrodynamic numerical model to test the effect of historical environmental change and the time scale, direction, and magnitude of wind forcing on negative and positive surge events in the New York Harbor (NYH). Environmental sensitivity experiments show that dredging of shipping channels is an important factor affecting blowouts while changing ice cover and removal of other roughness elements are unimportant in NYH. Continuously measured water level records since 1860 show a trend towards smaller negative surge magnitudes (measured minus predicted water level) but do not show a significant change to ELW magnitudes after removing the sea-level trend. Model results suggest that the smaller negative surges occur in the deeper, dredged modern system due to a reduced tide-surge interaction, primarily through a reduced phase shift in the predicted tide. The sensitivity of surge to wind direction changes spatially with remote wind effects dominating local wind effects near NYH. Convergent coastlines that amplify positive surges also amplify negative surges, a process we term inverse coastal funneling.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the US Army Corps of Engineers (agreement no. W9127N-14-2-0015; S. Talke, PI), the NSF (Career Award 1455350; PI Talke), NASA’s Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Science ROSES-2012 (grant NNX14AD48G; Kushnir, PI), and a Provost’s Doctoral Fellowship, Stevens Institute of Technology.en_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7050160
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectestuaryen_US
dc.subjectnegative surgeen_US
dc.subjectblowouten_US
dc.subjectstorm surgeen_US
dc.subjectfunnelingen_US
dc.subjecttide-surge interactionen_US
dc.subjectwind set-downen_US
dc.subjectNew York Harboren_US
dc.subjectdredgingen_US
dc.titleMechanics and historical evolution of sea level blowouts in New York harboren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/jmse7050160


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International