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dc.contributor.authorSchlosser, Tamara L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJones, Nicole L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMusgrave, Ruth C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBluteau, Cynthia E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorIvey, Gregory N.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Andrew J.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-06T19:41:50Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-16
dc.identifier.citationSchlosser, T. L., Jones, N. L., Musgrave, R. C., Bluteau, C. E., Ivey, G. N., & Lucas, A. J. (2019). Observations of diurnal coastal-trapped waves with a thermocline-intensified velocity field. Journal of Physical Oceanography, 49(7), 1973-1994.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/24522
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2019. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Physical Oceanography 49(7), (2019): 1973-1994, doi: 10.1175/JPO-D-18-0194.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing 18 days of field observations, we investigate the diurnal (D1) frequency wave dynamics on the Tasmanian eastern continental shelf. At this latitude, the D1 frequency is subinertial and separable from the highly energetic near-inertial motion. We use a linear coastal-trapped wave (CTW) solution with the observed background current, stratification, and shelf bathymetry to determine the modal structure of the first three resonant CTWs. We associate the observed D1 velocity with a superimposed mode-zero and mode-one CTW, with mode one dominating mode zero. Both the observed and mode-one D1 velocity was intensified near the thermocline, with stronger velocities occurring when the thermocline stratification was stronger and/or the thermocline was deeper (up to the shelfbreak depth). The CTW modal structure and amplitude varied with the background stratification and alongshore current, with no spring–neap relationship evident for the observed 18 days. Within the surface and bottom Ekman layers on the shelf, the observed velocity phase changed in the cross-shelf and/or vertical directions, inconsistent with an alongshore propagating CTW. In the near-surface and near-bottom regions, the linear CTW solution also did not match the observed velocity, particularly within the bottom Ekman layer. Boundary layer processes were likely causing this observed inconsistency with linear CTW theory. As linear CTW solutions have an idealized representation of boundary dynamics, they should be cautiously applied on the shelf.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipAn Australian Research Council Discovery Project (DP 140101322), and a UWA Research Collaboration Award funded this work. T. L. Schlosser acknowledges the support of an Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP) Scholarship. We thank the crew, volunteers and scientists who aided in the field data collection aboard the R/V Revelle, which was funded by the National Science Foundation (OCE-1129763). The continental slope moorings, T4 (M32) and T3 (M44), were also funded by the National Science Foundation (OCE-1129763) and were conceived, planned, and executed by Matthew Alford, Jennifer Mackinnon, Jonathan Nash, Harper Simmons, and Gunnar Voet. We also thank Harper Simmons for the combined R/V Revelle multibeam and Geoscience Australia bathymetry used in this study. We thank the two anonymous reviewers whose comments improved this work.en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-18-0194.1
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectContinental shelf/slopeen_US
dc.subjectBoundary currentsen_US
dc.subjectDynamicsen_US
dc.subjectWaves, oceanicen_US
dc.titleObservations of diurnal coastal-trapped waves with a thermocline-intensified velocity fielden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2020-01-16en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-18-0194.1
dc.embargo.liftdate2020-01-16


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