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dc.contributor.authorGemmell, Brad J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorColin, Sean P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCostello, John H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Kelly R.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-09T14:09:58Z
dc.date.available2019-05-09T14:09:58Z
dc.date.issued2019-03-20
dc.identifier.citationGemmell, B. J., Colin, S. P., Costello, J. H., & Sutherland, K. R. (2019). A ctenophore (comb jelly) employs vortex rebound dynamics and outperforms other gelatinous swimmers. Royal Society Open Science, 6(3), 181615.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/24101
dc.description© The Author(s), 2019. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Gemmell, B. J., Colin, S. P., Costello, J. H., & Sutherland, K. R. (2019). A ctenophore (comb jelly) employs vortex rebound dynamics and outperforms other gelatinous swimmers. Royal Society Open Science, 6(3), (2019):181615, doi:10.1098/rsos.181615.en_US
dc.description.abstractGelatinous zooplankton exhibit a wide range of propulsive swimming modes. One of the most energetically efficient is the rowing behaviour exhibited by many species of schyphomedusae, which employ vortex interactions to achieve this result. Ctenophores (comb jellies) typically use a slow swimming, cilia-based mode of propulsion. However, species within the genus Ocyropsis have developed an additional propulsive strategy of rowing the lobes, which are normally used for feeding, in order to rapidly escape from predators. In this study, we used high-speed digital particle image velocimetry to examine the kinematics and fluid dynamics of this rarely studied propulsive mechanism. This mechanism allows Ocyropsis to achieve size-adjusted speeds that are nearly double those of other large gelatinous swimmers. The investigation of the fluid dynamic basis of this escape mode reveals novel vortex interactions that have not previously been described for other biological propulsion systems. The arrangement of vortices during escape swimming produces a similar configuration and impact as that of the well-studied ‘vortex rebound’ phenomenon which occurs when a vortex ring approaches a solid wall. These results extend our understanding of how animals use vortex–vortex interactions and provide important insights that can inform the bioinspired engineering of propulsion systems.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the grants from the National Science Foundation UNS-1511996 and IDBR-1455471 to B.J.G., S.P.C. and J.H.C. as well as OCE-1829945 to B.J.G., S.P.C., J.H.C. and K.R.S.en_US
dc.publisherThe Royal Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://doi.org/10.1098/rsos.181615
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectvortex interactionsen_US
dc.subjectjellyfishen_US
dc.subjectplanktonen_US
dc.subjectpropulsionen_US
dc.subjectbioengineeringen_US
dc.subjectbiomechanicsen_US
dc.titleA ctenophore (comb jelly) employs vortex rebound dynamics and outperforms other gelatinous swimmersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsos.181615


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International