Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPiecuch, Christopher G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHuybers, Peter  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHay, Carling C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKemp, Andrew C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Christopher M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMitrovica, Jerry X.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPonte, Rui M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTingley, Martin P.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-14T18:47:44Z
dc.date.issued2018-12-18
dc.identifier.citationPiecuch, C. G., Huybers, P., Hay, C. C., Kemp, A. C., Little, C. M., Mitrovica, J. X., Ponte, R. M., & Tingley, M. P. (2018). Origin of spatial variation in US east coast sea-level trends during 1900-2017. Nature, 564(7736), 400-404.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/23801
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Authors, 2018. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Nature Research for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Piecuch, C. G., Huybers, P., Hay, C. C., Kemp, A. C., Little, C. M., Mitrovica, J. X., Ponte, R. M., & Tingley, M. P. (2018). Origin of spatial variation in US east coast sea-level trends during 1900-2017. Nature, 564(7736), 400-404, doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0787-6.en_US
dc.description.abstractIdentifying the causes of historical trends in relative sea level—the height of the sea surface relative to Earth’s crust—is a prerequisite for predicting future changes. Rates of change along the U.S. East Coast during the last century were spatially variable, and relative sea level rose faster along the Mid-Atlantic Bight than the South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine. Past studies suggest that Earth’s ongoing response to the last deglaciation1–5, surface redistribution of ice and water 5–9, and changes in ocean circulation9–13 contributed importantly to this large-scale spatial pattern. Here we analyze instrumental data14, 15 and proxy reconstructions4, 12 using probabilistic methods16–18 to show that vertical motions of Earth’s crust exerted the dominant control on regional spatial differences in relative sea level trends along the U.S. East Coast during 1900–2017, explaining a majority of the large-scale spatial variance. Rates of coastal subsidence caused by ongoing relaxation of the peripheral forebulge associated with the last deglaciation are strongest near North Carolina,Maryland, and Virginia. Such structure indicates that Earth’s elastic lithosphere is thicker than has been assumed in other models19–22. We also find a significant coastal gradient in relative sea level trends over this period that is unrelated to deglaciation, and suggests contributions from twentieth-century redistribution of ice and water. Our results indicate that the majority of large-scale spatial variation in longterm rates of relative sea level rise on the U.S. East Coast was due to geological processes that will persist at similar rates for centuries into the future.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding came from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Investment in Science Fund; Harvard University; NSF awards 1558939, 1558966, and 1458921; and NASA awards NNH16CT01C, NNX17AE17G, and 80NSSC17K0698. We acknowledge helpful conversations with S. Adhikari, B.D. Hamlington, F.W. Landerer, S.J. Lentz, and P.R. Thompson. Comments from three anonymous referees and the editor, Michael White, are greatly appreciated.en_US
dc.publisherNature Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0787-6
dc.titleOrigin of spatial variation in US East Coast sea-level trends during 1900-2017en_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
dc.description.embargo2019-06-18en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41586-018-0787-6
dc.embargo.liftdate2019-06-18


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record