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dc.contributor.authorScileppi, Elyse  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Jeffrey P.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2007-09-06T16:24:02Z
dc.date.available2007-09-06T16:24:02Z
dc.date.issued2007-06-21
dc.identifier.citationGeochemistry Geophysics Geosystems 8 (2007): Q06011en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/1786
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems 8 (2007): Q06011, doi:10.1029/2006GC001463.en
dc.description.abstractEvidence of historical landfalling hurricanes and prehistoric storms has been recovered from backbarrier environments in the New York City area. Overwash deposits correlate with landfalls of the most intense documented hurricanes in the area, including the hurricanes of 1893, 1821, 1788, and 1693 A.D. There is little evidence of intense hurricane landfalls in the region for several hundred years prior to the late 17th century A.D. The apparent increase in intense hurricane landfalls around 300 years ago occurs during the latter half of the Little Ice Age, a time of lower tropical sea surface temperatures. Multiple washovers laid down between ~2200 and 900 cal yr B.P. suggest an interval of frequent intense hurricane landfalls in the region. Our results provide preliminary evidence that fluctuations in intense hurricane landfall in the northeastern United States were roughly synchronous with hurricane landfall fluctuations observed for the Caribbean and Gulf Coast, suggesting North Atlantic–wide changes in hurricane activity.en
dc.description.sponsorshipGrants from the National Science Foundation (EAR 0519118), Risk Prediction Initiative at the Bermuda Biological Station for Research, and the Coastal Ocean Institute of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution supported this research.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2006GC001463
dc.subjectHurricaneen
dc.subjectClimateen
dc.subjectCoastal geologyen
dc.subjectSalt marshen
dc.subjectSedimentationen
dc.subjectNew Yorken
dc.titleSedimentary evidence of hurricane strikes in western Long Island, New Yorken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2006GC001463


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