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dc.contributor.authorAdams, Diane K.  Concept link
dc.coverage.spatialEast Pacific Rise
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-27T15:12:28Z
dc.date.available2007-08-27T15:12:28Z
dc.date.issued2007-06
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/1779
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution June 2007en
dc.description.abstractExamination of the scales at which larval supply varies spatially and temporally, and correlation with concurrent physical observations can provide insights into larval transport mechanisms that contribute to structuring marine benthic communities. In order to facilitate field studies, this thesis first provides new morphological and genetic identifications for hydrothermal vent gastropod larvae along the northern East Pacific Rise. Daily and weekly variability in the supply of hydrothermal vent gastropod larvae to two hydrothermal vents, 1.6 km apart on the East Pacific Rise, were quantified concurrently with current velocity observations. The magnitude and temporal pattern of larval supply differed between vent sites, despite their close proximity. A strong correlation between along-axis flow and daily larval supply suggested that larval supply occurred primarily via along-axis transport between local sources 1-2 km apart. However, weekly larval supply appeared to be driven by larger spatial scales through losses associated with cross-axis flows and the passage of mesoscale eddies. Tracer movement within a quasi-geostrophic eddy model was consistent with the observations of decreased larval supply concurrent with an eddy observed via satellite altimetry. The tracer movement also indicated that deep eddy-induced flow could facilitate a long-distance dispersal event, enhancing dispersal between vents 100s km apart.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFinancial support was provided by a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, the WHOI Academic Programs Office, a WHOI Ocean Venture Fund award, the Ocean Life Institute, the Deep Ocean Exploration Institute, and NSF grants OCE0424953 and NSF OCE9712233 to L.S. Mullineaux.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutionen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWHOI Thesesen
dc.subjectHydrothermal circulationen_US
dc.subjectLarvae dispersalen_US
dc.subjectAtlantis (Ship : 1996-) Cruise AT11-20en_US
dc.titleInfluence of hydrodynamics on the larval supply to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Riseen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.1575/1912/1779


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