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dc.contributor.authorWhite, Helen K.  Concept link
dc.coverage.spatialGuaymas Basin
dc.coverage.spatialPeru Margin
dc.coverage.spatialBenguela Upwelling
dc.coverage.spatialSanta Monica Basin
dc.coverage.spatialNew England Margin
dc.coverage.spatialWashington Margin
dc.coverage.spatialEel River Margin
dc.coverage.spatialPettaquamscutt River
dc.coverage.spatialPenobscot Bay
dc.coverage.spatialLowes Cove
dc.coverage.spatialBlakely Harbor
dc.coverage.spatialWest Falmouth, MA
dc.coverage.spatialMackenzie Shelf
dc.coverage.spatialRoss Sea
dc.date.accessioned2007-02-22T21:39:37Z
dc.date.available2007-02-22T21:39:37Z
dc.date.issued2006-02
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/1512
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution February 2006en
dc.description.abstractTo provide a new perspective on the fate of both natural organic matter and hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in marine sediments, we have investigated the relationship between radiocarbon (14C) age and the different modes of association in aquatic sediments and soils. Radiocarbon is a sensitive tracer of OM provenance, with variations in its natural abundance reflecting the age and origin of material. The main objective has been to determine the significance of these associations, and to assess how they affect the transport, bioavailability, preservation and residence times of organic compounds in the environment. Our results indicate that the majority of HOCs that persist in marine sediments are solvent-extractable and incorporation into insoluble sediment residues is not quantitatively significant. For pristine sediments, systematic variations in 14C content are observed between different chemically defined sedimentary organic fractions. These variations are dependent on organic matter inputs and/or the affects of diagenesis. Our observations also provide evidence for the protection of labile marine carbon by chemical binding. Finally, the persistence of n-alkanes from biogenic sources compared to those derived from petroleum indicates that protective matrix association can play a crucial role in determining the long-term fate of a compound. Overall, it is clear that both natural organic compounds and HOCs can undergo very different fates depending on their mode of introduction to, and physical disposition in environmental matrices.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this research was provided by the National Science Foundation, CHE-0089172 to T.I. Eglinton and C.M. Reddy, and OCE-82567700 to T.I. Eglinton. I received support from a Charles Davis Hollister Fellowship from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.en
dc.format.extent3628654 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutionen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWHOI Thesesen
dc.subjectMarine sedimentsen
dc.subjectCarbon compoundsen
dc.titleIsotopic constraints on the sources and associations of organic compounds in marine sedimentsen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.identifier.doi10.1575/1912/1512


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