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dc.contributor.authorCardinal, Emily A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRadford, Craig A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMensinger, Allen F.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-26T19:51:48Z
dc.date.available2019-05-26T08:19:38Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-26
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Experimental Biology 221 (2018): jeb180679en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/10729
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Company of Biologists, 2018. This article is posted here by permission of The Company of Biologists for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Experimental Biology 221 (2018): jeb180679, doi:10.1242/jeb.180679.en_US
dc.description.abstractMale oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau) acoustically attract females to nesting sites using a boatwhistle call. The rapid speed of sound underwater combined with the close proximity of the otolithic organs makes inner ear interaural time differences an unlikely mechanism to localize sound. To determine the role that the mechanosensory lateral line may play in sound localization, microwire electrodes were bilaterally implanted into the anterior lateral line nerve to record neural responses to vibrational stimuli. Highest spike rates and strongest phase-locking occurred at distances close to the fish and decreased as the stimulus was moved further from the fish. Bilateral anterior lateral line neuromasts displayed differential directional sensitivity to incoming vibrational stimuli, which suggests the potential for the lateral line to be used for sound localization in the near field. The present study also demonstrates that the spatially separated neuromasts of the toadfish may provide sufficient time delays between sensory organs for determining sound localization cues. Multimodal sensory input processing through both the inner ear (far field) and lateral line (near field) may allow for effective sound localization in fish.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the National Science Foundation (IOS 1354745 to A.F.M.). C.A.R. was funded through a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship from the Royal Society of New Zealand and a Marine Biological Laboratory fellowship.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCompany of Biologistsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.180679
dc.subjectFishen_US
dc.subjectMechanosensationen_US
dc.subjectSensory systemen_US
dc.titlePotential role of the anterior lateral line in sound localization in toadfish (Opsanus tau)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2019-05-26en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1242/jeb.180679


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