Biologging of emperor penguins-attachment techniques and associated deployment performance

dc.contributor.author Houstin, Aymeric
dc.contributor.author Zitterbart, Daniel
dc.contributor.author Winterl, Alexander
dc.contributor.author Richter, Sebastian
dc.contributor.author Planas-Bielsa, Víctor
dc.contributor.author Chevallier, Damien
dc.contributor.author Ancel, André
dc.contributor.author Fournier, Jérôme
dc.contributor.author Fabry, Ben
dc.contributor.author Le Bohec, Céline
dc.date.accessioned 2022-12-06T20:55:57Z
dc.date.available 2022-12-06T20:55:57Z
dc.date.issued 2022-08-04
dc.description © The Author(s), 2022. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Houstin, A., Zitterbart, D., Winterl, A., Richter, S., Planas-Bielsa, V., Chevallier, D., Ancel, A., Fournier, J., Fabry, B., & Le Bohec, C. Biologging of emperor penguins-attachment techniques and associated deployment performance. PLoS One, 17(8), (2022): e0265849, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0265849. en_US
dc.description.abstract An increasing number of marine animals are equipped with biologgers, to study their physiology, behaviour and ecology, often for conservation purposes. To minimise the impacts of biologgers on the animals’ welfare, the Refinement principle from the Three Rs framework (Replacement, Reduction, Refinement) urges to continuously test and evaluate new and updated biologging protocols. Here, we propose alternative and promising techniques for emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) capture and on-site logger deployment that aim to mitigate the potential negative impacts of logger deployment on these birds. We equipped adult emperor penguins for short-term (GPS, Time-Depth Recorder (TDR)) and long-term (i.e. planned for one year) deployments (ARGOS platforms, TDR), as well as juvenile emperor penguins for long-term deployments (ARGOS platforms) in the Weddell Sea area where they had not yet been studied. We describe and qualitatively evaluate our protocols for the attachment of biologgers on-site at the colony, the capture of the animals and the recovery of the devices after deployment. We report unprecedented recaptures of long-term equipped adult emperor penguins (50% of equipped individuals recaptured after 290 days). Our data demonstrate that the traditional technique of long-term attachment by gluing the biologgers directly to the back feathers causes excessive feather breakage and the loss of the devices after a few months. We therefore propose an alternative method of attachment for back-mounted devices. This technique led to successful year-round deployments on 37.5% of the equipped juveniles. Finally, we also disclose the first deployments of leg-bracelet mounted TDRs on emperor penguins. Our findings highlight the importance of monitoring potential impacts of biologger deployments on the animals and the need to continue to improve methods to minimize disturbance and enhance performance and results. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship This study was funded by the Centre Scientifique de Monaco with additional support from the LIA-647 and RTPI-NUTRESS (CSM/CNRS¬-University of Strasbourg), by The Penzance Endowed Fund and The Grayce B. Kerr Fund in Support of Assistant Scientists and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) grants ZI1525/3-1 in the framework of the priority program “Antarctic research with comparative investigations in Arctic ice areas”. Logistics and field efforts were supported by the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) within the framework of the program MARE. en_US
dc.identifier.citation Houstin, A., Zitterbart, D., Winterl, A., Richter, S., Planas-Bielsa, V., Chevallier, D., Ancel, A., Fournier, J., Fabry, B., & Le Bohec, C. (2022). Biologging of emperor penguins-attachment techniques and associated deployment performance. PLoS One, 17(8), e0265849. en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0265849
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/1912/29550
dc.publisher Public Library of Science en_US
dc.relation.uri https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0265849
dc.rights Attribution 4.0 International *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ *
dc.title Biologging of emperor penguins-attachment techniques and associated deployment performance en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dspace.entity.type Publication
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