Slattery Marc

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Slattery
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Marc
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Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Dataset
    Depth-dependent irradiance from sunrise to sunset across the shallow to mesophotic depth gradient for three coral morphologies from a backward Monte Carlo ray-tracing model
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2021-02-22) Lesser, Michael P. ; Slattery, Marc
    Mesophotic coral reefs, defined as deep reefs between 30 and 150 m, are found worldwide and are largely structured by changes in the underwater light field. Additionally, it is increasingly understood that reef-to-reef variability in topography, combined with quantitative and qualitative changes in the underwater light field with increasing depth, significantly influence the observed changes in coral distribution and abundance. Here we take a modeling approach to examine the effects of the inherent optical properties of the water column on the irradiance that corals are exposed to along a shallow to mesophotic depth gradient. In particular, the roles of reef topography including horizontal, sloping and vertical substrates are quantified as well as the differences between mounding, plating and branching colony morphologies. Downwelling irradiance and reef topography interact such that for a water mass of similar optical properties the irradiance reaching the benthos varies significantly with topography (i.e., substrate angle). Corals with different morphologies also interact with these benthic irradiances; model results show that isolated hemispherical colonies consistently “see” greater irradiances across depths, and throughout the day, compared to plating and branching morphologies. The differences in the photoautotrophic potential of different coral morphologies, based on the changes in irradiance modelled here, are not, however, consistent with depth-dependent distributions of these coral morphotypes. Other factors (e.g., heterotrophy) arguably contribute, but irradiance driven patterns are a strong proximate cause for the observed differences in mesophotic communities on sloping versus vertical reef substrates. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/841083
  • Article
    Biochemical mechanisms for geographical adaptations to novel toxin exposures in butterflyfish
    (Public Library of Science, 2016-05-03) Maldonado, Aileen ; Lavado, Ramon ; Knuston, Sean ; Slattery, Marc ; Ankisetty, Sridevi ; Goldstone, Jared V. ; Watanabe, Kayo ; Hoh, Eunha ; Gadepalli, Rama S. ; Rimoldi, John M. ; Ostrander, Gary K. ; Schlenk, Daniel
    Some species of butterflyfish have had preyed upon corals for millions of years, yet the mechanism of butterflyfish specialized coral feeding strategy remains poorly understood. Certain butterflyfish have the ability to feed on allelochemically rich soft corals, e.g. Sinularia maxima. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is the predominant enzyme system responsible for the detoxification of dietary allelochemicals. CYP2-like and CYP3A-like content have been associated with butterflyfish that preferentially consumes allelochemically rich soft corals. To investigate the role of butterflyfish CYP2 and CYP3A enzymes in dietary preference, we conducted oral feeding experiments using homogenates of S. maxima and a toxin isolated from the coral in four species of butterflyfish with different feeding strategies. After oral exposure to the S. maxima toxin 5-episinulaptolide (5ESL), which is not normally encountered in the Hawaiian butterflyfish diet, an endemic specialist, Chaetodon multicinctus experienced 100% mortality compared to a generalist, Chaetodon auriga, which had significantly more (3–6 fold higher) CYP3A-like basal content and catalytic activity. The specialist, Chaetodon unimaculatus, which preferentially feed on S. maxima in Guam, but not in Hawaii, had 100% survival, a significant induction of 8–12 fold CYP3A-like content, and an increased ability (2-fold) to metabolize 5ESL over other species. Computer modeling data of CYP3A4 with 5ESL were consistent with microsomal transformation of 5ESL to a C15-16 epoxide from livers of C. unimaculatus. Epoxide formation correlated with CYP3A-like content, catalytic activity, induction, and NADPH-dependent metabolism of 5ESL. These results suggest a potentially important role for the CYP3A family in butterflyfish-coral diet selection through allelochemical detoxification.
  • Dataset
    NCBI accessions and metadata associated with Caribbean sponge metagenomes collected from Curacao, Belize, Cayman Islands and St. Croix, 2009 and 2017-2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2019-08-19) Lesser, Michael P. ; Slattery, Marc
    NCBI accessions and metadata associated with Caribbean sponge metagenomes collected from Curacao, Belize, Cayman Islands and St. Croix, 2009 and 2017-2018. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/775451
  • Preprint
    Contemporary 14C radiocarbon levels of oxygenated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (O-PBDEs) isolated in sponge–cyanobacteria associations
    ( 2010-12) Guitart, Carlos ; Slattery, Marc ; Ankisetty, Sridevi ; Radwan, Mohamed ; Ross, Samir J. ; Letcher, Robert J. ; Reddy, Christopher M.
    Considerable debate surrounds the sources of oxygenated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (O-PBDEs) in wildlife as to whether they are naturally produced or result from anthropogenic industrial activities. Natural radiocarbon (14C) abundance has proven to be a powerful tool to address this problem as recently biosynthesized compounds contain contemporary (i.e. modern) amounts of atmospheric radiocarbon; whereas industrial chemicals, mostly produced from fossil fuels, contain no detectable 14C. However, few compounds isolated from organisms have been analyzed for their radiocarbon content. To provide a baseline, we analyzed the 14C content of four OPBDEs. These compounds, 6-OH-BDE47, 2’-OH-BDE68, 2’,6-diOH-BDE159, and a recently identified compound, 2’-MeO-6-OH-BDE120, were isolated from the tropical marine sponges Dysidea granulosa and Lendenfeldia dendyi. The modern radiocarbon content of their chemical structures (i.e. diphenyl ethers, C12H22O) indicates that they are naturally produced. This adds to a growing baseline on, at least, the sources of these unusual compounds.
  • Dataset
    Proximate biochemistry of sponge species collected in 2017 and 2018 across the Caribbean Basin in Curacao, Belize, Grand Cayman, St. Croix
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2022-01-14) Slattery, Marc ; Gochfeld, Deborah J
    Proximate biochemistry of sponge species collected in 2017 and 2018 across the Caribbean Basin in Curacao, Belize, Grand Cayman, St. Croix. These data were published in Clayshulte Abraham et al. (2021). For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/868047