Van de Putte Anton

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Last Name
Van de Putte
First Name
Anton
ORCID
0000-0003-1336-5554

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Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Article
    Ocean FAIR data services
    (Frontiers Media, 2019-08-07) Tanhua, Toste ; Pouliquen, Sylvie ; Hausman, Jessica ; O’Brien, Kevin ; Bricher, Phillippa ; de Bruin, Taco ; Buck, Justin J. H. ; Burger, Eugene ; Carval, Thierry ; Casey, Kenneth S. ; Diggs, Stephen ; Giorgetti, Alessandra ; Glaves, Helen ; Harscoat, Valerie ; Kinkade, Danie ; Muelbert, Jose H. ; Novellino, Antonio ; Pfeil, Benjamin ; Pulsifer, Peter L. ; Van de Putte, Anton ; Robinson, Erin ; Schaap, Dick ; Smirnov, Alexander ; Smith, Neville ; Snowden, Derrick ; Spears, Tobias ; Stall, Shelley ; Tacoma, Marten ; Thijsse, Peter ; Tronstad, Stein ; Vandenberghe, Thomas ; Wengren, Micah ; Wyborn, Lesley ; Zhao, Zhiming
    Well-founded data management systems are of vital importance for ocean observing systems as they ensure that essential data are not only collected but also retained and made accessible for analysis and application by current and future users. Effective data management requires collaboration across activities including observations, metadata and data assembly, quality assurance and control (QA/QC), and data publication that enables local and interoperable discovery and access and secures archiving that guarantees long-term preservation. To achieve this, data should be findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR). Here, we outline how these principles apply to ocean data and illustrate them with a few examples. In recent decades, ocean data managers, in close collaboration with international organizations, have played an active role in the improvement of environmental data standardization, accessibility, and interoperability through different projects, enhancing access to observation data at all stages of the data life cycle and fostering the development of integrated services targeted to research, regulatory, and operational users. As ocean observing systems evolve and an increasing number of autonomous platforms and sensors are deployed, the volume and variety of data increase dramatically. For instance, there are more than 70 data catalogs that contain metadata records for the polar oceans, a situation that makes comprehensive data discovery beyond the capacity of most researchers. To better serve research, operational, and commercial users, more efficient turnaround of quality data in known formats and made available through Web services is necessary. In particular, automation of data workflows will be critical to reduce friction throughout the data value chain. Adhering to the FAIR principles with free, timely, and unrestricted access to ocean observation data is beneficial for the originators, has obvious benefits for users, and is an essential foundation for the development of new services made possible with big data technologies.
  • Article
    Toward a new data standard for combined marine biological and environmental datasets - expanding OBIS beyond species occurrences
    (Pensoft, 2017-01-09) De Pooter, Daphnis ; Appeltans, Ward ; Bailly, Nicolas ; Bristol, Sky ; Deneudt, Klaas ; Eliezer, Menashè ; Fujioka, Ei ; Giorgetti, Alessandra ; Goldstein, Philip ; Lewis, Mirtha ; Lipizer, Marina ; Mackay, Kevin ; Marin, Maria ; Moncoiffe, Gwenaelle ; Nikolopoulou, Stamatina ; Provoost, Pieter ; Rauch, Shannon ; Roubicek, Andres ; Torres, Carlos ; van de Putte, Anton ; Vandepitte, Leen ; Vanhoorne, Bart ; Vinci, Matteo ; Wambiji, Nina ; Watts, David ; Salas, Eduardo Klein ; Hernandez, Francisco
    The Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) is the world’s most comprehensive online, open-access database of marine species distributions. OBIS grows with millions of new species observations every year. Contributions come from a network of hundreds of institutions, projects and individuals with common goals: to build a scientific knowledge base that is open to the public for scientific discovery and exploration and to detect trends and changes that inform society as essential elements in conservation management and sustainable development. Until now, OBIS has focused solely on the collection of biogeographic data (the presence of marine species in space and time) and operated with optimized data flows, quality control procedures and data standards specifically targeted to these data. Based on requirements from the growing OBIS community to manage datasets that combine biological, physical and chemical measurements, the OBIS-ENV-DATA pilot project was launched to develop a proposed standard and guidelines to make sure these combined datasets can stay together and are not, as is often the case, split and sent to different repositories. The proposal in this paper allows for the management of sampling methodology, animal tracking and telemetry data, biological measurements (e.g., body length, percent live cover, ...) as well as environmental measurements such as nutrient concentrations, sediment characteristics or other abiotic parameters measured during sampling to characterize the environment from which biogeographic data was collected. The recommended practice builds on the Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) standard and on practices adopted by the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). It consists of a DwC Event Core in combination with a DwC Occurrence Extension and a proposed enhancement to the DwC MeasurementOrFact Extension. This new structure enables the linkage of measurements or facts - quantitative and qualitative properties - to both sampling events and species occurrences, and includes additional fields for property standardization. We also embrace the use of the new parentEventID DwC term, which enables the creation of a sampling event hierarchy. We believe that the adoption of this recommended practice as a new data standard for managing and sharing biological and associated environmental datasets by IODE and the wider international scientific community would be key to improving the effectiveness of the knowledge base, and will enhance integration and management of critical data needed to understand ecological and biological processes in the ocean, and on land.
  • Article
    Allometric relationships of ecologically important Antarctic and Arctic zooplankton and fish species
    (Springer, 2022-01-08) Schaafsma, Fokje L. ; David, Carmen L. ; Kohlbach, Doreen ; Ehrlich, Julia ; Castellani, Giulia ; Lange, Benjamin A. ; Vortkamp, Martina ; Meijboom, André ; Fortuna-Wünsch, Anna ; Immerz, Antonia ; Cantzler, Hannelore ; Klasmeier, Apasiri ; Zakharova, Nadezhda ; Schmidt, Katrin ; Van de Putte, Anton ; van Franeker, Jan A. ; Flores, Hauke
    Allometric relationships between body properties of animals are useful for a wide variety of purposes, such as estimation of biomass, growth, population structure, bioenergetic modelling and carbon flux studies. This study summarizes allometric relationships of zooplankton and nekton species that play major roles in polar marine food webs. Measurements were performed on 639 individuals of 15 species sampled during three expeditions in the Southern Ocean (winter and summer) and 2374 individuals of 14 species sampled during three expeditions in the Arctic Ocean (spring and summer). The information provided by this study fills current knowledge gaps on relationships between length and wet/dry mass of understudied animals, such as various gelatinous zooplankton, and of animals from understudied seasons and maturity stages, for example, for the krill Thysanoessa macrura and larval Euphausia superba caught in winter. Comparisons show that there is intra-specific variation in length–mass relationships of several species depending on season, e.g. for the amphipod Themisto libellula. To investigate the potential use of generalized regression models, comparisons between sexes, maturity stages or age classes were performed and are discussed, such as for the several krill species and T. libellula. Regression model comparisons on age classes of the fish E. antarctica were inconclusive about their general use. Other allometric measurements performed on carapaces, eyes, heads, telsons, tails and otoliths provided models that proved to be useful for estimating length or mass in, e.g. diet studies. In some cases, the suitability of these models may depend on species or developmental stages.
  • Article
    Reviews and syntheses: a framework to observe, understand and project ecosystem response to environmental change in the East Antarctic Southern Ocean
    (European Geosciences Union, 2022-11-23) Gutt, Julian ; Arndt, Stefanie ; Barnes, David Keith Alan ; Bornemann, Horst ; Brey, Thomas ; Eisen, Olaf ; Institute, Hauke ; Griffiths, Huw ; Institute, Christian ; Hain, Stefan ; Hattermann, Tore ; Held, Christoph ; Hoppema, Mario ; Isla, Enrique ; Janout, Markus ; Le Bohec, Céline ; Link, Heike ; Mark, Felix Christopher ; Moreau, Sebastien ; Trimborn, Scarlett ; Van Opzeeland, Ilse ; Pörtner, Hans-Otto ; Schaafsma, Fokje ; Teschke, Katharina ; Tippenhauer, Sana ; Van De Putte, Anton ; Wege, Mia ; Zitterbart, Daniel ; Piepenburg, Dieter
    Systematic long-term studies on ecosystem dynamics are largely lacking from the East Antarctic Southern Ocean, although it is well recognized that they are indispensable to identify the ecological impacts and risks of environmental change. Here, we present a framework for establishing a long-term cross-disciplinary study on decadal timescales. We argue that the eastern Weddell Sea and the adjacent sea to the east, off Dronning Maud Land, is a particularly well suited area for such a study, since it is based on findings from previous expeditions to this region. Moreover, since climate and environmental change have so far been comparatively muted in this area, as in the eastern Antarctic in general, a systematic long-term study of its environmental and ecological state can provide a baseline of the current situation, which will be important for an assessment of future changes from their very onset, with consistent and comparable time series data underpinning and testing models and their projections. By establishing an Integrated East Antarctic Marine Research (IEAMaR) observatory, long-term changes in ocean dynamics, geochemistry, biodiversity, and ecosystem functions and services will be systematically explored and mapped through regular autonomous and ship-based synoptic surveys. An associated long-term ecological research (LTER) programme, including experimental and modelling work, will allow for studying climate-driven ecosystem changes and interactions with impacts arising from other anthropogenic activities. This integrative approach will provide a level of long-term data availability and ecosystem understanding that are imperative to determine, understand, and project the consequences of climate change and support a sound science-informed management of future conservation efforts in the Southern Ocean.