Lam Phoebe J.

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Last Name
Lam
First Name
Phoebe J.
ORCID
0000-0001-6609-698X

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Now showing 1 - 20 of 62
  • Preprint
    Kinetics of thorium and particle cycling along the U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic Transect
    ( 2017-05) Lerner, Paul ; Marchal, Olivier ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Buesseler, Ken O. ; Charette, Matthew A.
    The high particle reactivity of thorium has resulted in its widespread use in tracing processes impacting marine particles and their chemical constituents. The use of thorium isotopes as tracers of particle dynamics, however, largely relies on our understanding of how the element scavenges onto particles. Here, we estimate apparent rate constants of Th adsorption (k1), Th desorption (k−1), bulk particle degradation (β-1), and bulk particle sinking speed (w) along the water column at 11 open-ocean stations occupied during the GEOTRACES North Atlantic Section (GA03). First, we provide evidence that the budgets of Th isotopes and particles at these stations appear to be generally dominated by radioactive production and decay sorption reactions, particle degradation, and particle sinking. Rate parameters are then estimated by fitting a Th and particle cycling model to data of dissolved and particulate 228,230,234Th, 228Ra, particle concentrations, and 234,238U estimates based on salinity, using a nonlinear programming technique. We find that the adsorption rate constant (k1) generally decreases with depth across the section: broadly, the time scale 1/k1 averages 1.0 yr in the upper 1000 m and (1.4–1.5) yr below. A positive relationship between k1 and particle concentration (P) is found, i.e., , k1 ∝ Pb where b ≥ 1, consistent with the notion that k1 increases with the number of surface sites available for adsorption. The rate constant ratio, K = k1/(k-1 + β-1), which measures the collective influence of rate parameters on Th scavenging, averages 0.2 for most stations and most depths. We clarify the conditions under which K/P is equivalent to the distribution coefficient, KD, test that the conditions are met at the stations, and find that decreases with P, in line with a particle concentration effect (dKD/dP < 0). In contrast to the influence of colloids as envisioned by the Brownian pumping hypothesis, we provide evidence that the particle concentration effect arises from the joint effect of P on the rate constants for thorium attachment to, and detachment from, particles.
  • Preprint
    Near-field iron and carbon chemistry of non-buoyant hydrothermal plume particles, Southern East Pacific Rise 15°S
    ( 2018-01) Hoffman, Colleen L. ; Nicholas, Sarah L. ; Ohnemus, Daniel C. ; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N. ; Sherrell, Robert M. ; German, Christopher R. ; Heller, Maija Iris ; Lee, Jong-mi ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Toner, Brandy M.
  • Article
    Barite precipitation on suspended organic matter in the mesopelagic zone
    (Frontiers Media, 2020-10-28) Martinez-Ruiz, Francisca ; Paytan, Adina ; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa ; Jroundi, Fadwa ; Abad, María Del Mar ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Horner, Tristan J. ; Kastner, Miriam
    Mechanisms underlying barite precipitation in seawater and the precise depths of barite precipitation in the water column have been debated for decades. Here we present a detailed study of water column barite distribution in the mesopelagic zone at diverse stations in the open ocean by analyzing samples collected using multiple unit large volume in-situ filtration systems in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian oceans. Our results demonstrate that barite is an organo-mineral particularly abundant at intermediate depths throughout the world’s ocean regardless of saturation state with respect to barite. This is confirming the notion of precipitation at depths of intense organic matter mineralization. Our observations further support the link between barite formation and microbial activity, demonstrated by the association of barite particles with organic matter aggregates and with extracellular polymeric substances. Evidence for microbial mediation is consistent with previous experimental work showing that in bacterial biofilms Ba binds to phosphate groups on cell surfaces and within extracellular polymeric substances. This organo-accumulation promotes high concentrations of Ba leading to saturated microenvironments and nucleation sites favoring precipitation. The distribution of Ba isotopes in the water column and in particulate matter is also consistent with the proposed precipitation mechanism.
  • Article
    Strong margin influence on the Arctic Ocean Barium Cycle revealed by pan‐Arctic synthesis
    (American Geophysical Union, 2022-03-22) Whitmore, Laura M. ; Shiller, Alan M. ; Horner, Tristan J. ; Xiang, Yang ; Auro, Maureen E. ; Bauch, Dorothea ; Dehairs, Frank ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Li, Jingxuan ; Maldonado, Maria T. ; Mears, Chantal ; Newton, Robert ; Pasqualini, Angelica ; Planquette, Helene ; Rember, Robert ; Thomas, Helmuth
    Early studies revealed relationships between barium (Ba), particulate organic carbon and silicate, suggesting applications for Ba as a paleoproductivity tracer and as a tracer of modern ocean circulation. But, what controls the distribution of barium (Ba) in the oceans? Here, we investigated the Arctic Ocean Ba cycle through a one-of-a-kind data set containing dissolved (dBa), particulate (pBa), and stable isotope Ba ratio (δ138Ba) data from four Arctic GEOTRACES expeditions conducted in 2015. We hypothesized that margins would be a substantial source of Ba to the Arctic Ocean water column. The dBa, pBa, and δ138Ba distributions all suggest significant modification of inflowing Pacific seawater over the shelves, and the dBa mass balance implies that ∼50% of the dBa inventory (upper 500 m of the Arctic water column) was supplied by nonconservative inputs. Calculated areal dBa fluxes are up to 10 μmol m−2 day−1 on the margin, which is comparable to fluxes described in other regions. Applying this approach to dBa data from the 1994 Arctic Ocean Survey yields similar results. The Canadian Arctic Archipelago did not appear to have a similar margin source; rather, the dBa distribution in this section is consistent with mixing of Arctic Ocean-derived waters and Baffin Bay-derived waters. Although we lack enough information to identify the specifics of the shelf sediment Ba source, we suspect that a sedimentary remineralization and terrigenous sources (e.g., submarine groundwater discharge or fluvial particles) are contributors.
  • Article
    Visualising Fe speciation diversity in ocean particulate samples by micro X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy
    (CSIRO Publishing, 2013-10-09) Marcus, Matthew A. ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    It is a well known truism that natural materials are inhomogeneous, so analysing them on a point-by-point basis can generate a large volume of data, from which it becomes challenging to extract understanding. In this paper, we show an example in which particles taken from the ocean in two different regions (the Western Subarctic Pacific and the Australian sector of the Southern Ocean, south of Tasmania) are studied by Fe K-edge micro X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (μXANES). The resulting set of data consists of 209 spectra from the Western Subarctic Pacific and 126 from the Southern Ocean. We show the use of principal components analysis with an interactive projection visualisation tool to reduce the complexity of the data to something manageable. The Western Subarctic Pacific particles were grouped into four main populations, each of which was characterised by spectra consistent with mixtures of 1–3 minerals: (1) Fe3+ oxyhydroxides + Fe3+ clays + Fe2+ phyllosilicates, (2) Fe3+ clays, (3) mixed-valence phyllosilicates and (4) magnetite + Fe3+ clays + Fe2+ silicates, listed in order of abundance. The Southern Ocean particles break into three clusters: (1) Fe3+-bearing clays + Fe3+ oxyhydroxides, (2) Fe2+ silicates + Fe3+ oxyhydroxides and (3) Fe3+ oxides + Fe3+-bearing clays + Fe2+ silicates, in abundance order. Although there was some overlap between the two regions, this analysis shows that the particulate Fe mineral assemblage is distinct between the Western Subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean, with potential implications for the bioavailability of particulate Fe in these two iron-limited regions. We then discuss possible advances in the methods, including automatic methods for characterising the structure of the data.
  • Preprint
    Testing models of thorium and particle cycling in the ocean using data from station GT11-22 of the U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic section
    ( 2016-03-31) Lerner, Paul ; Marchal, Olivier ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Anderson, Robert F. ; Buesseler, Ken O. ; Charette, Matthew A. ; Edwards, R. Lawrence ; Hayes, Christopher T. ; Huang, Kuo-Fang ; Lu, Yanbin ; Robinson, Laura F. ; Solow, Andrew R.
    Thorium is a highly particle-reactive element that possesses different measurable radio-isotopes in seawater, with well-constrained production rates and very distinct half-lives. As a result, Th has emerged as a key tracer for the cycling of marine particles and of their chemical constituents, including particulate organic carbon. Here two different versions of a model of Th and particle cycling in the ocean are tested using an unprecedented data set from station GT11-22 of the U.S. GEOTRACES North Atlantic Section: (i) 21 228;230;234Th activities of dissolved and particulate fractions, (ii) 228Ra activities, (iii) 234;238U activities estimated from salinity data and an assumed 234U/238U ratio, and (iv) particle concentrations, below a depth of 125 m. The two model versions assume a single class of particles but rely on different assumptions about the rate parameters for sorption reactions and particle processes: a first version (V1) assumes vertically uniform parameters (a popular description), whereas the second (V2) does not. Both versions are tested by fitting to the GT11-22 data using generalized nonlinear least squares and by analyzing residuals normalized to the data errors. We find that model V2 displays a significantly better fit to the data than model V1. Thus, the mere allowance of vertical variations in the rate parameters can lead to a significantly better fit to the data, without the need to modify the structure or add any new processes to the model. To understand how the better fit is achieved we consider two parameters, K = k1=(k-1 + β-1) and K/P, where k1 is the adsorption rate constant, k-1 the desorption rate constant, β-1 the remineralization rate constant, and P the particle concentration. We find that the rate constant ratio K is large (≥0.2) in the upper 1000 m and decreases to a nearly uniform value of ca. 0.12 below 2000 m, implying that the specific rate at which Th attaches to particles relative to that at which it is released from particles is higher in the upper ocean than in the deep ocean. In contrast, K/P increases with depth below 500 m. The parameters K and K/P display significant positive and negative monotonic relationship with P, respectively, which is collectively consistent with a particle concentration effect.
  • Preprint
    Distributions of dissolved and particulate iron in the sub-Antarctic and Polar Frontal Southern Ocean (Australian sector)
    ( 2011-01) Lannuzel, Delphine ; Bowie, Andrew R. ; Remenyi, Tomas A. ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Townsend, Ashley T. ; Ibisanmi, Enitan ; Butler, Edward ; Wagener, Thibaut ; Schoemann, Veronique
    This paper presents iron (Fe) profiles in the upper 1000 m from nine short-term (transect) stations and three long-term (process) stations occupied in the Australian sector of the Southern Ocean during the SAZ-Sense expedition in austral summer (January–February) 2007. Strong vertical and horizontal gradients in Fe concentrations were observed between the 18 sampled profiles (i.e. 0.09–0.63 nmol/l dissolved Fe (dFe)). Average dFe concentrations in surface waters in the northern Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ-N) West (station P1) were 0.27±0.04 nmol/l. This is lower than in the SAZ-N East region (station P3 and around) where average dFe values in the mixed layer were 0.48±0.10 nmol/l. The Polar Front (PF) station (P2) exhibited the lowest average surface Fe values (i.e. 0.22±0.02 nmol/l). Iron concentrations in deep waters down to 1000 m were more uniform (0.25–0.37 nmol/l dFe), which is in accordance with values reported elsewhere in remote waters of the Southern Ocean, but lower than those observed in the North Atlantic and North Pacific basins. A strong decoupling was observed between dFe and nutrient cycles at all stations. Particulate Fe levels were generally very low for all SAZ stations (<0.08 – 1.38 nmol/l), with higher values observed at stations collected near Tasmania and in the SAZ-N East region. The intrusion of subtropical waters, enriched with Fe from sediments or dust further north, is thought to mediate Fe input to the SAZ-N and STZ areas, while input from below would be the main source of Fe in the PF region. We applied the tracer Fe* (Fe*= [dFe]-RFe:P × [PO4 3-], where RFe:P is the algal uptake ratio) to estimate the degree to which the water masses were Fe limited. In this study, Fe* tended to be negative and decreased with increasing depths and latitude. Positive Fe* values, indicating Fe sufficiency, were observed in the (near-)surface waters collected in the SAZ-N East and near continental sources, where primary production was higher and ultimately limited by the lack of macro-nutrients, not Fe. Micro-organisms residing in the SAZ-N West and PF on the other hand experienced negative Fe*, indicating a strong co-limitation by low silicic acid concentration and Fe supply (and light in the case of PF).
  • Article
    Coastal sources, sinks and strong organic complexation of dissolved cobalt within the US North Atlantic GEOTRACES transect GA03
    (Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union, 2017-06-02) Noble, Abigail E. ; Ohnemus, Daniel C. ; Hawco, Nicholas J. ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Saito, Mak A.
    Cobalt is the scarcest of metallic micronutrients and displays a complex biogeochemical cycle. This study examines the distribution, chemical speciation, and biogeochemistry of dissolved cobalt during the US North Atlantic GEOTRACES transect expeditions (GA03/3_e), which took place in the fall of 2010 and 2011. Two major subsurface sources of cobalt to the North Atlantic were identified. The more prominent of the two was a large plume of cobalt emanating from the African coast off the eastern tropical North Atlantic coincident with the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) likely due to reductive dissolution, biouptake and remineralization, and aeolian dust deposition. The occurrence of this plume in an OMZ with oxygen above suboxic levels implies a high threshold for persistence of dissolved cobalt plumes. The other major subsurface source came from Upper Labrador Seawater, which may carry high cobalt concentrations due to the interaction of this water mass with resuspended sediment at the western margin or from transport further upstream. Minor sources of cobalt came from dust, coastal surface waters and hydrothermal systems along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The full depth section of cobalt chemical speciation revealed near-complete complexation in surface waters, even within regions of high dust deposition. However, labile cobalt observed below the euphotic zone demonstrated that strong cobalt-binding ligands were not present in excess of the total cobalt concentration there, implying that mesopelagic labile cobalt was sourced from the remineralization of sinking organic matter. In the upper water column, correlations were observed between total cobalt and phosphate, and between labile cobalt and phosphate, demonstrating a strong biological influence on cobalt cycling. Along the western margin off the North American coast, this correlation with phosphate was no longer observed and instead a relationship between cobalt and salinity was observed, reflecting the importance of coastal input processes on cobalt distributions. In deep waters, both total and labile cobalt concentrations were lower than in intermediate depth waters, demonstrating that scavenging may remove labile cobalt from the water column. Total and labile cobalt distributions were also compared to a previously published South Atlantic GEOTRACES-compliant zonal transect (CoFeMUG, GAc01) to discern regional biogeochemical differences. Together, these Atlantic sectional studies highlight the dynamic ecological stoichiometry of total and labile cobalt. As increasing anthropogenic use and subsequent release of cobalt poses the potential to overpower natural cobalt signals in the oceans, it is more important than ever to establish a baseline understanding of cobalt distributions in the ocean.
  • Preprint
    The effect of sample drying temperature on marine particulate organic carbon composition
    ( 2018-02) Rosengard, Sarah Z. ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; McNichol, Ann P. ; Johnson, Carl G. ; Galy, Valier
    Compositional changes in marine particulate organic carbon (POC) throughout the water column trace important processes that underlie the biological pump’s efficiency. While labor-intensive, particle sampling efforts offer potential to expand the empirical POC archive at different stages in the water column, provided that organic composition is sufficiently preserved between sampling and analysis. The standard procedure for preserving organic matter composition in marine samples is to immediately store particles at -80°C to -20°C until they can be freeze-dried for analysis. This report investigates the effect of warmer drying and storage temperatures on POC composition, which applies to the majority of POC samples collected in the field without intention for organic analysis. Particle samples collected off Woods Hole, MA were immediately dried at 56°C, at room temperature, or stored at -80°C until being freeze-dried. Results show that oven- and air-drying did not shift the bulk composition (i.e., carbon and nitrogen content and stable isotope composition) of POC in the samples relative to freeze-drying. Similarly, warmer drying temperatures did not affect POC thermal stability, as inferred by ramped pyrolysis/oxidation (RPO), a growing technique that uses a continuous temperature ramp to differentiate components of organic carbon by their decomposition temperature. Oven- and air-drying did depress lipid abundances relative to freeze-drying, the extent of which depended on compound size and structure. The data suggest that field samples dried at room temperatures and 56°C are appropriate for assessing bulk POC composition and thermal stability, but physical mechanisms such as molecular volatilization bias their lipid composition.
  • Article
    Basin-scale inputs of cobalt, iron, and manganese from the Benguela-Angola front to the South Atlantic Ocean
    (Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, 2012-07) Noble, Abigail E. ; Lamborg, Carl H. ; Ohnemus, Daniel C. ; Lam, Phoebe J. ; Goepfert, Tyler J. ; Measures, Christopher I. ; Frame, Caitlin H. ; Casciotti, Karen L. ; DiTullio, Giacomo R. ; Jennings, Joe C. ; Saito, Mak A.
    We present full-depth zonal sections of total dissolved cobalt, iron, manganese, and labile cobalt from the South Atlantic Ocean. A basin-scale plume from the African coast appeared to be a major source of dissolved metals to this region, with high cobalt concentrations in the oxygen minimum zone of the Angola Dome and extending 2500 km into the subtropical gyre. Metal concentrations were elevated along the coastal shelf, likely due to reductive dissolution and resuspension of particulate matter. Linear relationships between cobalt, N2O, and O2, as well as low surface aluminum supported a coastal rather than atmospheric cobalt source. Lateral advection coupled with upwelling, biological uptake, and remineralization delivered these metals to the basin, as evident in two zonal transects with distinct physical processes that exhibited different metal distributions. Scavenging rates within the coastal plume differed for the three metals; iron was removed fastest, manganese removal was 2.5 times slower, and cobalt scavenging could not be discerned from water mass mixing. Because scavenging, biological utilization, and export constantly deplete the oceanic inventories of these three hybrid-type metals, point sources of the scale observed here likely serve as vital drivers of their oceanic cycles. Manganese concentrations were elevated in surface waters across the basin, likely due to coupled redox processes acting to concentrate the dissolved species there. These observations of basin-scale hybrid metal plumes combined with the recent projections of expanding oxygen minimum zones suggest a potential mechanism for effects on ocean primary production and nitrogen fixation via increases in trace metal source inputs.
  • Dataset
    CTD data from the GTC rosette on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-08-05) Cutter, Gregory ; Casciotti, Karen L. ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    CTD data from the GTC rosette on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/778332
  • Dataset
    Compilation of MULVFS size-fractionated POC, PIC, and bSi data from 17 cruises conducted between 1973 and 2005
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2022-11-23) Bishop, James K.B. ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    This dataset reports 74 profiles of <53um and >53um concentrations of particulate organic carbon (POC), particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and biogenic silica (bSi) collected and analyzed by James K.B. Bishop from 17 cruises using ship-powered (Multiple Unit) Large Volume In-situ Filtration (LVFS, later MULVFS) between 1973 and 2005. The dataset was compiled by Phoebe Lam. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/884057
  • Dataset
    Size-fractionated major and minor particle composition and concentration from R/V Knorr KN199-04, KN204-01 in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-2011 (U.S. GEOTRACES NAT project)
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-02-26) Lam, Phoebe J.
    Size-fractionated major and minor particle composition and concentration from R/V Knorr KN199-04, KN204-01 in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean from 2010-2011 (U.S. GEOTRACES NAT project). For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/3871
  • Dataset
    Original scanned cast sheets (jpg format) of ODF rosette casts on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-08-05) Casciotti, Karen L. ; Cutter, Gregory ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    Original scanned cast sheets (jpg format) of ODF rosette casts on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/778599
  • Dataset
    Bottle file from Leg 2 (Hilo, HI to Papeete, French Polynesia) of the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15, RR1815) on R/V Roger Revelle from October to November 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-09-22) Casciotti, Karen L. ; Cutter, Gregory ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    Bottle data collected by the GTC (GEOTRACES Trace element Carousel) and ODF (Ocean Data Facility) CTD rosettes, underway, and tow fish on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15). Leg 2 (RR1815) took place from 25 October to 23 November 2018 on R/V Roger Revelle. Data from the different sampling systems was compiled into one file by ODF. For complete acquisition and processing information, refer to the cruise report. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/824867
  • Dataset
    Size-fractionated major and minor particle composition and concentration from the from the US GEOTRACES Arctic cruise (HLY1502) on USCGC Healy from August to October 2015
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-04-13) Lam, Phoebe J.
    Size-fractionated major and minor particle composition and concentration from the U.S. GEOTRACES Arctic Cruise (GN01) in 2015. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/807340
  • Dataset
    Original scanned cast sheets (jpg and pdf formats) of the GTC rosette casts on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-08-05) Cutter, Gregory ; Casciotti, Karen L. ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    Original scanned cast sheets (jpg and pdf formats) of the GTC rosette casts on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/779985
  • Dataset
    Original scanned sample logs (jpg and pdf formats) from the GTC rosette casts on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-08-05) Cutter, Gregory ; Casciotti, Karen L. ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    Original scanned sample logs (jpg and pdf formats) from the GTC rosette casts on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/780049
  • Dataset
    Bottle file from the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2020-08-04) Casciotti, Karen L. ; Cutter, Gregory ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    Bottle data collected by the GTC (GEOTRACES Trace element Carousel) and ODF (Ocean Data Facility) CTD rosettes, underway, and tow fish on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15) from September to November 2018 on R/V Roger Revelle. Data from the different sampling systems was compiled into one file by ODF. For complete acquisition and processing information, refer to the cruise report. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/777951
  • Dataset
    Bottle file from Leg 1 (Seattle, WA to Hilo, HI) of the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15, RR1814) on R/V Roger Revelle from September to October 2018
    (Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). Contact: bco-dmo-data@whoi.edu, 2021-05-05) Casciotti, Karen L. ; Cutter, Gregory A. ; Lam, Phoebe J.
    Bottle data collected by the GTC (GEOTRACES Trace element Carousel) and ODF (Ocean Data Facility) CTD rosettes, underway, and tow fish on the US GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) cruise (GP15). Leg 1 (RR1814) took place from 24 September to 21 October 2018 on R/V Roger Revelle. Data from the different sampling systems was compiled into one file by ODF. For complete acquisition and processing information, refer to the cruise report. For a complete list of measurements, refer to the full dataset description in the supplemental file 'Dataset_description.pdf'. The most current version of this dataset is available at: https://www.bco-dmo.org/dataset/777951