Rainville Luc

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Last Name
Rainville
First Name
Luc
ORCID
0000-0001-7337-225X

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Article
    Overview of the Arctic Sea state and boundary layer physics program
    (American Geophysical Union, 2018-04-16) Thomson, Jim ; Ackley, Stephen ; Girard-Ardhuin, Fanny ; Ardhuin, Fabrice ; Babanin, Alexander ; Boutin, Guillaume ; Brozena, John ; Cheng, Sukun ; Collins, Clarence ; Doble, Martin ; Fairall, Christopher W. ; Guest, Peter ; Gebhardt, Claus ; Gemmrich, Johannes ; Graber, Hans C. ; Holt, Benjamin ; Lehner, Susanne ; Lund, Björn ; Meylan, Michael ; Maksym, Ted ; Montiel, Fabien ; Perrie, Will ; Persson, Ola ; Rainville, Luc ; Rogers, W. Erick ; Shen, Hui ; Shen, Hayley ; Squire, Vernon ; Stammerjohn, Sharon E. ; Stopa, Justin ; Smith, Madison M. ; Sutherland, Peter ; Wadhams, Peter
    A large collaborative program has studied the coupled air‐ice‐ocean‐wave processes occurring in the Arctic during the autumn ice advance. The program included a field campaign in the western Arctic during the autumn of 2015, with in situ data collection and both aerial and satellite remote sensing. Many of the analyses have focused on using and improving forecast models. Summarizing and synthesizing the results from a series of separate papers, the overall view is of an Arctic shifting to a more seasonal system. The dramatic increase in open water extent and duration in the autumn means that large surface waves and significant surface heat fluxes are now common. When refreezing finally does occur, it is a highly variable process in space and time. Wind and wave events drive episodic advances and retreats of the ice edge, with associated variations in sea ice formation types (e.g., pancakes, nilas). This variability becomes imprinted on the winter ice cover, which in turn affects the melt season the following year.
  • Article
    Dynamics in the deep Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean, inferred by thermistor chain time series
    (American Meteorological Society, 2007-04) Timmermans, Mary-Louise ; Melling, Humfrey ; Rainville, Luc
    A 50-day time series of high-resolution temperature in the deepest layers of the Canada Basin in the Arctic Ocean indicates that the deep Canada Basin is a dynamically active environment, not the quiet, stable basin often assumed. Vertical motions at the near-inertial (tidal) frequency have amplitudes of 10– 20 m. These vertical displacements are surprisingly large considering the downward near-inertial internal wave energy flux typically observed in the Canada Basin. In addition to motion in the internal-wave frequency band, the measurements indicate distinctive subinertial temperature fluctuations, possibly due to intrusions of new water masses.
  • Article
    Internal waves in the Arctic : influence of ice concentration, ice roughness, and surface layer stratification
    (John Wiley & Sons, 2018-08-14) Cole, Sylvia T. ; Toole, John M. ; Rainville, Luc ; Lee, Craig M.
    The Arctic ice cover influences the generation, propagation, and dissipation of internal waves, which in turn may affect vertical mixing in the ocean interior. The Arctic internal wavefield and its relationship to the ice cover is investigated using observations from Ice‐Tethered Profilers with Velocity and Seaglider sampling during the 2014 Marginal Ice Zone experiment in the Canada Basin. Ice roughness, ice concentration, and wind forcing all influenced the daily to seasonal changes in the internal wavefield. Three different ice concentration thresholds appeared to determine the evolution of internal wave spectral energy levels: (1) the initial decrease from 100% ice concentration after which dissipation during the surface reflection was inferred to increase, (2) the transition to 70–80% ice concentration when the local generation of internal waves increased, and (3) the transition to open water that was associated with larger‐amplitude internal waves. Ice roughness influenced internal wave properties for ice concentrations greater than approximately 70–80%: smoother ice was associated with reduced local internal wave generation. Richardson numbers were rarely supercritical, consistent with weak vertical mixing under all ice concentrations. On decadal timescales, smoother ice may counteract the effects of lower ice concentration on the internal wavefield complicating future predictions of internal wave activity and vertical mixing.
  • Article
    Near-inertial internal wave field in the Canada Basin from ice-tethered profilers
    (American Meteorological Society, 2014-02) Dosser, Hayley V. ; Rainville, Luc ; Toole, John M.
    Salinity and temperature profiles from drifting ice-tethered profilers in the Beaufort gyre region of the Canada Basin are used to characterize and quantify the regional near-inertial internal wave field over one year. Vertical displacements of potential density surfaces from the surface to 750-m depth are tracked from fall 2006 to fall 2007. Because of the time resolution and irregular sampling of the ice-tethered profilers, near-inertial frequency signals are marginally resolved. Complex demodulation is used to determine variations with a time scale of several days in the amplitude and phase of waves at a specified near-inertial frequency. Characteristics and variability of the wave field over the course of the year are investigated quantitatively and related to changes in surface wind forcing and sea ice cover.
  • Article
    Mixing across the Arctic Ocean : microstructure observations during the Beringia 2005 Expedition
    (American Geophysical Union, 2008-04-30) Rainville, Luc ; Winsor, Peter
    Turbulent-scale temperature and conductivity were measured during the pan-arctic Beringia 2005 Expedition. The rates of dissipation of thermal variance and diapycnal diffusivities are calculated along a section from Alaska to the North Pole, across deep flat basins (Canada and Makarov Basins) and steep ridges (Alpha-Mendeleev and Lomonosov Ridges). The mixing rates are observed to be small relative to lower latitudes but also remarkably non-uniform. Relatively elevated turbulence is found over deep topography, confirming the dominant role of bottom-generated internal waves. Measured patterns of mixing in the Arctic are also associated with other mechanisms, such as double-diffusive structures and deep overflows. A better knowledge of the distribution of mixing is essential to understand the dynamics of the changing Arctic environment.