Yohe Gary

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Evaluating knowledge to support climate action: A framework for sustained assessment. report of an independent advisory committee on applied climate assessment.

2019-05-21 , Moss, Richard H. , Avery, Susan K. , Baja, Kristin , Burkett, Maxine , Chischilly, Ann Marie , Dell, Janet , Fleming, P. A. , Geil, Kerrie L. , Jacobs, Katharine L. , Jones, Alan H. , Knowlton, Kim , Koh, Jay , Lemos, Maria Carmen , Melillo, Jerry M. , Pandya, Rajul , Richmond, Terese , Scarlett, Lynn , Snyder, Jared , Stults, Melissa , Waple, Anne , Whitehead, Jessica , Zarrilli, Daniel , Ayyub, Bilal M. , Fox, James , Ganguly, Auroop , Joppa, Lucas , Julius, Susan , Kirshen, Paul , Kreutter, Rebecca , McGovern, Amy , Meyer, Ryan , Neumann, James , Solecki, William , Smith, Joel , Tissot, Philippe , Yohe, Gary , Zimmerman, Rae

As states, cities, tribes, and private interests cope with climate damages and seek to increase preparedness and resilience, they will need to navigate myriad choices and options available to them. Making these choices in ways that identify pathways for climate action that support their development objectives will require constructive public dialogue, community participation, and flexible and ongoing access to science- and experience-based knowledge. In 2016, a Federal Advisory Committee (FAC) was convened to recommend how to conduct a sustained National Climate Assessment (NCA) to increase the relevance and usability of assessments for informing action. The FAC was disbanded in 2017, but members and additional experts reconvened to complete the report that is presented here. A key recommendation is establishing a new nonfederal “climate assessment consortium” to increase the role of state/local/tribal government and civil society in assessments. The expanded process would 1) focus on applied problems faced by practitioners, 2) organize sustained partnerships for collaborative learning across similar projects and case studies to identify effective tested practices, and 3) assess and improve knowledge-based methods for project implementation. Specific recommendations include evaluating climate models and data using user-defined metrics; improving benefit–cost assessment and supporting decision-making under uncertainty; and accelerating application of tools and methods such as citizen science, artificial intelligence, indicators, and geospatial analysis. The recommendations are the result of broad consultation and present an ambitious agenda for federal agencies, state/local/tribal jurisdictions, universities and the research sector, professional associations, nongovernmental and community-based organizations, and private-sector firms.

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The challenge to detect and attribute effects of climate change on human and natural systems

2013-08-30 , Stone, Daithi , Auffhammer, Maximilian , Carey, Mark , Hansen, Gerrit , Huggel, Christian , Cramer, Wolfgang , Lobell, David , Molau, Ulf , Solow, Andrew R. , Tibig, Lourdes , Yohe, Gary

Anthropogenic climate change has triggered impacts on natural and human systems world-wide, yet the formal scientific method of detection and attribution has been only insufficiently described. Detection and attribution of impacts of climate change is a fundamentally cross-disciplinary issue, involving concepts, terms, and standards spanning the varied requirements of the various disciplines. Key problems for current assessments include the limited availability of long-term observations, the limited knowledge on processes and mechanisms involved in changing environmental systems, and the widely different concepts applied in the scientific literature. In order to facilitate current and future assessments, this paper describes the current conceptual framework of the field and outlines a number of conceptual challenges. Based on this, it proposes workable cross-disciplinary definitions, concepts, and standards. The paper is specifically intended to serve as a baseline for continued development of a consistent cross-disciplinary framework that will facilitate integrated assessment of the detection and attribution of climate change impacts.

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Framework for sustained climate assessment in the United States

2019-06-04 , Moss, Richard H. , Avery, Susan K. , Baja, Kristin , Burkett, Maxine , Chischilly, Ann Marie , Dell, Janet , Fleming, P. A. , Geilf, Kerrie L. , Jacobs, Katharine L. , Jones, Alan H. , Knowlton, Kim , Koh, Jay , Lemos, Maria Carmen , Melillo, Jerry M. , Pandya, Rajul , Richmond, Terese , Scarlett, Lynn , Snyder, Jared , Stults, Melissa , Waple, Anne , Whitehead, Jessica , Zarrilli, Daniel , Fox, James , Ganguly, Auroop , Joppa, Lucas , Julius, Susan , Kirshen, Paul , Kreutter, Rebecca , McGovern, Amy , Meyer, Ryan , Neumann, James , Solecki, William , Smith, Joel , Tissot, Philippe , Yohe, Gary , Zimmerman, Rae

As states, cities, tribes, and private interests cope with climate damages and seek to increase preparedness and resilience, they will need to navigate myriad choices and options available to them. Making these choices in ways that identify pathways for climate action that support their development objectives will require constructive public dialogue, community participation, and flexible and ongoing access to science- and experience-based knowledge. In 2016, a Federal Advisory Committee (FAC) was convened to recommend how to conduct a sustained National Climate Assessment (NCA) to increase the relevance and usability of assessments for informing action. The FAC was disbanded in 2017, but members and additional experts reconvened to complete the report that is presented here. A key recommendation is establishing a new nonfederal “climate assessment consortium” to increase the role of state/local/tribal government and civil society in assessments. The expanded process would 1) focus on applied problems faced by practitioners, 2) organize sustained partnerships for collaborative learning across similar projects and case studies to identify effective tested practices, and 3) assess and improve knowledge-based methods for project implementation. Specific recommendations include evaluating climate models and data using user-defined metrics; improving benefit–cost assessment and supporting decision-making under uncertainty; and accelerating application of tools and methods such as citizen science, artificial intelligence, indicators, and geospatial analysis. The recommendations are the result of broad consultation and present an ambitious agenda for federal agencies, state/local/tribal jurisdictions, universities and the research sector, professional associations, nongovernmental and community-based organizations, and private-sector firms.