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dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Sean M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLekberg, Ylva  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMummey, Daniel  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSangwan, Naseer  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRamsey, Philip W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Jack A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-20T17:57:39Z
dc.date.available2017-09-12T15:20:06Z
dc.date.available2017-09-20T17:57:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-07
dc.identifier.citationmSystems 2 (2017): e00178-16en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/9219
dc.description© The Author(s), 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in mSystems 2 (2017): e00178-16, doi:10.1128/mSystems.00178-16.en_US
dc.description.abstractPlant invasions often reduce native plant diversity and increase net primary productivity. Invaded soils appear to differ from surrounding soils in ways that impede restoration of diverse native plant communities. We hypothesize that invader-mediated shifts in edaphic properties reproducibly alter soil microbial community structure and function. Here, we take a holistic approach, characterizing plant, prokaryotic, and fungal communities and soil physicochemical properties in field sites, invasion gradients, and experimental plots for three invasive plant species that cooccur in the Rocky Mountain West. Each invader had a unique impact on soil physicochemical properties. We found that invasions drove shifts in the abundances of specific microbial taxa, while overall belowground community structure and functional potential were fairly constant. Forb invaders were generally enriched in copiotrophic bacteria with higher 16S rRNA gene copy numbers and showed greater microbial carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolic potential. Older invasions had stronger effects on abiotic soil properties, indicative of multiyear successions. Overall, we show that plant invasions are idiosyncratic in their impact on soils and are directly responsible for driving reproducible shifts in the soil environment over multiyear time scales.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSean Gibbons was supported by an EPA STAR Graduate Fellowship and National Institutes of Health training grant 5T-32EB-009412. Other funding for this project was provided by MPG Ranch and DOE contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1128/mSystems.00178-16
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subject16S RNAen_US
dc.subjectCopiotrophen_US
dc.subjectMetagenomicsen_US
dc.subjectOligotrophen_US
dc.subjectPlant invasionsen_US
dc.subjectPlant-microbe interactionsen_US
dc.subjectSoil bacteriaen_US
dc.subjectSoil fungien_US
dc.subjectSoil microbiologyen_US
dc.titleInvasive plants rapidly reshape soil properties in a grassland ecosystemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/mSystems.00178-16


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Attribution 4.0 International
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