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dc.contributor.authorPearl, Esther J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMorrow, Sean  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorNoble, Anna  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLerebours, Adelaide  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHorb, Marko E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGuille, Matthew  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-20T19:53:13Z
dc.date.available2017-03-20T19:53:13Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-17
dc.identifier.citationTheriogenology 92 (2017): 149–155en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1912/8813
dc.description© The Author(s), 2017. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Theriogenology 92 (2017): 149–155, doi:10.1016/j.theriogenology.2017.01.007.en_US
dc.description.abstractCryogenic storage of sperm from genetically altered Xenopus improves cost effectiveness and animal welfare associated with their use in research; currently it is routine for X. tropicalis but not reliable for X. laevis. Here we compare directly the three published protocols for Xenopus sperm freeze-thaw and determine whether sperm storage temperature, method of testes maceration and delays in the freezing protocols affect successful fertilisation and embryo development in X. laevis. We conclude that the protocol is robust and that the variability observed in fertilisation rates is due to differences between individuals. We show that the embryos made from the frozen-thawed sperm are normal and that the adults they develop into are reproductively indistinguishable from others in the colony. This opens the way for using cryopreserved sperm to distribute dominant genetically altered (GA) lines, potentially saving travel-induced stress to the male frogs, reducing their numbers used and making Xenopus experiments more cost effective.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe EXRC is supported by the Wellcome Trust (101480/Z), BBSRC (BB/K019988/1) and NC3Rs (NC/P001009/1). The NXR is supported by a grant from the NIH (P40 OD010997).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.theriogenology.2017.01.007
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectXenopusen_US
dc.subjectSpermen_US
dc.subjectCryopreservationen_US
dc.subjectStock centresen_US
dc.subjectGenetically altered linesen_US
dc.subject3Rsen_US
dc.titleAn optimized method for cryogenic storage of Xenopus sperm to maximise the effectiveness of research using genetically altered frogsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.theriogenology.2017.01.007


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International